Kendrick Scott

Jonathan Chimene / WBGO

Gilad Hekselman has become one of the leading guitarists of his generation through a combination of factors, including his warm, lyrical sound and his willingness to push into the red. He features both sides of that aesthetic equation on his recent album Ask For Chaos, featuring a working trio as well as ZuperOctave, a more fusion-forward band.

Jonathan Chimene / WBGO

Tom Guarna is a guitarist of keen insight and broad experience, all of which he brought to this recent performance at the Yamaha Salon.

Guarna appeared on the series — usually a spotlight for pianists — as part of a guitar-centric triple bill organized by WBGO's John Newcott. (We'll soon post the two other performances, by For Living Lovers and the Gilad Hekselman Trio.) The set's rhythm section is first-rate by anyone's standard: David Kikoski on piano, Joe Martin on bass, and Kendrick Scott on drums.

Thomas Teal

Darrell Grant released Black Art, his first album on the Criss Cross label, in 1994. At the time he was the pianist in the Tony Williams Quintet, and making a strong statement on his own steam.


John Rogers for NPR / johnrogersnyc.com

Kurt Rosenwinkel, the illustrious guitarist and composer, will appear at S.O.B.'s on Friday as part of the lineup for WBGO @ 40

Half-price tickets are available to anyone who purchases online using the code WBGO40. Those with festival passes for the Winter Jazzfest Marathon are also welcome to attend. As we count down to the show, we thought it would be appropriate to revisit a standout Rosenwinkel set from the WBGO archives.

The Blue Note All-Stars released their official debut, Our Point of View, not quite a month ago, and one key takeaway from the album was the enduring shadow cast by Wayne Shorter.

Every musician in the group, from trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire to guitarist Lionel Loueke, is a student of Shorter’s legacy as a composer. The album features a brisk reworking of his “Witch Hunt,” from the 1966 album Speak No Evil, and Shorter even makes a cameo — along with a musical soul mate, Herbie Hancock — on a spooky version of “Masqualero.”

NPR

Almost every era of jazz has its resident Blue Note crew: artists who embody the beating heart of that label’s sound.

Kendrick Scott opened his first set on Tuesday night, at the Jazz Standard in New York City, with a pensive new composition titled "Home." It had a bittersweet melody, a waft of dark harmony, and a beat defined both by chop and flow. "I'm just going to send this out as a meditation for everybody in Houston, Texas right now," said Scott, a drummer, as he introduced the tune.