Newark Police Department

View From The Blue in Newark's 1967 Rebellion

Jul 12, 2017
Police
Star Ledger and The Newark Public Library

Through the 50 years since the Newark Rebellion in 1967, the police version of the story has seldom been told.  In 2007, historian and author Adele Oltman  filed this in-depth report for the WBGO Journal.

Oltman spoke to several officers who were there at the time of the unrest broke out, including John DeSimone, who was one of the arresting officers of taxi cab driver John Smith.

Click above to hear Adele Oltman's feature "View From The Blue."

Alexandra Hill

The Newark Police Department is rolling out its body and dash cam pilot program, as the embattled department continues to implement reforms as part of its five-year federal consent decree.

Public Safety Director Anthony Ambrose says 80 body worn cameras and 15 dashboard cameras, donated by Newark based tech giant Panasonic, will be outfitted to officers in the city’s south ward beginning Monday.

Newark Today

Apr 20, 2017

On this edition of Newark Today we talk policing and federal consent decrees in New Jersey's largest city with Mayor Ras J. Baraka, activist and leader of The People's Organization For Progress Larry Hamm, and former U. S. District Attorney for the state of New Jersey Paul Fishman. 

Alexandra Hill

In the wake of the numerous deaths of young black men at the hands of police, the rise of the black lives matter movement, and the mass incarceration epidemic, tensions have been at an all time high in recent years. A new program being launched in the city of Newark is working to change all that. The All Star Project’s Cops and Kids program is working to break the stereotypes that often lead to tension between young people and the police.

“Their cousins, their family members, fathers have been locked up before so it makes them have that negative outlook.”

Ang Santos / WBGO

The city of Newark openly invites every resident to take a ten to fifteen-minute paper survey of questions addressing their thoughts on Newark-police community relationships, based on personal experiences.  The site in central ward felt sort of like a school testing area, but the participants didn’t fill out their questionnaires in silence.  Many were openly voicing their support for the federal monitor over the Newark Police Department.