New Jersey

The New Jersey task force formed by Gov. Phil Murphy to look into the state’s generous tax break programs released its final report Thursday, which contains new allegations of lax oversight among regulators and impropriety on the part of hired consultants.

“The [Economic Development Authority] has fostered a permissive culture of ‘getting to yes’ with applicant companies,” said Ron Chen, a Rutgers Law professor and chair of the task force, “which resulted in a predisposition of EDA personnel to approve awards for tax incentives and at higher amounts when possible.”

On Wednesday, New Jersey officials reported 335 new COVID-19 cases, bringing the statewide total to 174,039.

The toll of confirmed deaths increased by 53 to 13,476 confirmed and 1,947 probable deaths.

The rate of transmission remains above 1.0, meaning for each patient positive with coronavirus, it is being spread to one other person.

Murphy to sign executive order mandating masks outside

Gov. Phil Murphy went live on MSNBC’s Morning Joe to announce an executive order requiring masks in outdoor public areas.

New Jersey officials on Monday reported 216 new COVID-19 cases, bringing the statewide total to 173,611.

The toll of confirmed deaths increased by 20 to 13,773, with 1,856 probable deaths.

Uptick in infection rate concerns officials

Gov. Phil Murphy said Monday that New Jersey’s rate of infection has gone above 1.0 for the first time in ten weeks.

As of July 4, the rate was at 1.03; meaning for every one person infected, it leads to at least one person getting infected.

N.J. Coronavirus Recovery: Casinos, Amusement Parks Reopen For Business

Jul 2, 2020

New Jersey reported another 539 cases of coronavirus Thursday, bringing the cumulative total over the course of the pandemic to 172,356.

The state also announced another 27 deaths. All told there have been 13,251 confirmed fatalities and 1,854 probable deaths due to COVID-19.

Open for business

Casinos are among several businesses reopening across New Jersey Thursday amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Though casinos can welcome gamblers, they won’t be able to serve alcohol or let patrons smoke. They must also cap admittance at 25% of capacity.

On Wednesday, New Jersey reported an additional 423 positive tests for COVID-19. The total number of positive cases now stands at 171,928.

An additional 45 deaths were reported, raising the toll to 13,224 confirmed deaths. There are also 1,854 probable deaths.

Despite language, Murphy says no private development at Liberty State Park

N.J. Coronavirus Recovery: Murphy Signs Budget Extension

Jun 30, 2020

New Jersey reported Tuesday an additional 461 positive tests for COVID-19. The total number of cases now stand at 171,667.

An additional 47 mortalities were added, raising the toll to 13,181 confirmed cases. There are also 1,854 probable deaths.

According to the state hospital association, there are 992 COVID patients in hospitals across the state as of 10 p.m. Monday; 211 are in intensive care. It is the second day in a row that hospitalizations remained under 1,000.

New Jersey’s primary election on July 7 could be the most overwhelmingly vote-by-mail contest in the state’s history.

The COVID-19 outbreak has forced lawmakers and state officials to prepare state and county election organizations for a surge in remote voting faster than they might have in the absence of a pandemic.

It likely means more of the state’s six million registered voters will cast their ballots from home, but they’ll have to wait longer for the results.

N.J. coronavirus recovery: Indoor dining is on pause

Jun 30, 2020

New Jersey reported 156 new COVID-19 cases and an additional 18 confirmed deaths from the coronavirus on Monday.

The state has recorded a total of 171,272 cases and 14,992 deaths.

Currently, there are 978 people in hospitals across the state and 225 in intensive care.

Indoor dining on pause until ‘a later date’

New Jersey reported another 524 cases of coronavirus Friday, bringing the state’s cumulative total to 170,584 since the start of the pandemic.

Another 44 residents died as a result of COVID-19. The state’s confirmed and probable fatalities now stand at 14,914.

School to reopen in September with restrictions

New Jersey schools will offer some form of in-person instruction this fall, but many students may also learn remotely, Gov. Phil Murphy announced Friday.

New Jersey reported another 406 cases of coronavirus Thursday, bringing the state’s total number of residents who tested positive for COVID-19 to 170,196.

Another 26 people were confirmed to have died from complications of the virus. The state also reported 1,854 probable deaths throughout the course of the pandemic, the first time it has released such a figure. It means New Jersey’s death toll now stands at 14,872.

Deaths spike as state begins counting ‘probable’ fatalities

New Jersey reported another 317 cases of coronavirus Wednesday, bringing the state’s total number of residents who tested positive for COVID-19 to 169,892.

Another 48 died from complications of the virus. The state has now lost 12,995 residents to coronavirus.

Travelers to N.J. from states with coronavirus spikes to self-quarantine

New Jersey reported another 382 cases of coronavirus Tuesday, bringing the state’s total number of residents who caught COVID-19 to 169,734.

Another 57 died from complications of the virus. The state has now lost 12,949 residents to coronavirus.

Amusement parks to reopen

Outdoor amusement and water parks in the Garden State can reopen beginning July 2, as the state continues to restart its economy amid a decline in new coronavirus infections.

Officials in New Jersey said Monday there were 359 new confirmed COVID-19 cases; bringing the statewide total to 169,415 confirmed COVID-19 cases.

Another 27 mortalities were reported raising the death toll to 12,895.

There 1,029 hospitalized patients according to the latest census from the state hospital association; 287 are in intensive care.

Tough love from the Gov.

While New Jersey continues a downward trend in the number of coronavirus cases, Gov. Phil Murphy felt the need to give “a little bit tough love.”

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announced Friday he supports a bill that would force applicants filing for environmental permits to take into account their impact on nearby low-income and marginalized communities.

The Democrat said it would be the strongest such law in the country.

“Some will look at what we’re championing here today and wonder why all the fuss for what is at its heart a bureaucratic action,” Murphy said. “But it is the seemingly small acts of government that can have huge impacts.”

New Jersey officials reported another 516 cases of coronavirus Friday, bringing the state’s overall total to 168,496 cases since March.

Another 37 residents died from complications of COVID-19, which means at least 12,835 have passed away from the illness.

Nursing homes to allow visitors

Long-term care facilities in New Jersey will be permitted to allow visitors once again starting Sunday.

New Jersey reported 442 new coronavirus cases Thursday, bringing the statewide total to 168,107.

And officials say there were 38 additional deaths reported, bringing the toll to 12,800.

Grewal urges dropping charges against protest organizers

Gov. Phil Murphy took flak for marching along with Black Lives Matter protesters even while the organizers of protests against his stay-at-home orders were ticketed. And now his attorney general is urging local law enforcement to drop such charges.

The 22,000 “Dreamers” living in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware can stay in the United States for now.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Trump administration violated the Administrative Procedures Act when it ended Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) in 2017.

In a 5-4 opinion written by Chief Justice John Roberts, the majority concluded that the administration’s decision was “arbitrary and capricious” and should be rescinded, but left the door open for the Department of Homeland Security to modify the program in the future.

New Jersey reported 330 new COVID-19 cases on Wednesday, bringing the total to 167,703.

There were 47 new deaths reported from the virus, raising the toll to 12,769.

Sixty-four people were admitted to hospitals across the state, raising the total number of hospitalizations to 1,352, according to the state hospital association; 358 patients are in intensive care.

Undocumented workers say they’re left out of recovery relief

New Jersey reported Tuesday 470 new confirmed COVID-19 cases; bringing the total to 167,426.

There were 51 new deaths reported from the virus raising the toll to 12,727.

Thirty-three people were admitted to hospitals across the state, raising the total number of hospitalizations to 1,291 according to the state hospital association; 362 patients are in intensive care.

Former assistant health commissioner blows whistle on Murphy officials

New Jersey reported another 495 cases of coronavirus Friday, bringing the state’s total to 166,164 confirmed cases.

The state lost another 48 residents to the disease, which means at least 12,489 New Jerseyans have died from complications of COVID-19.

State to sue Asbury Park over indoor dining

Gov. Phil Murphy announced Friday that the state will file a lawsuit against Asbury Park over a plan to allow restaurants to serve patrons indoors, which is still banned across the state to slow the spread of coronavirus.

New Jersey reported another 539 coronavirus cases Thursday, bringing the state’s total number of residents sickened to 165,816.

Another 70 residents died from complications of COVID-19. All told, 12,433 people have died in New Jersey from the disease.

Workers can refuse to return over safety fears

Workers recalled to their job, but concerned their employer has not met required health and safety standards or has violated a New Jersey executive order on COVID-19, can refuse to work and continue collecting unemployment benefits.

When New Jersey State Police Sgt. Randall Wetzel shot and killed Maurice Gordon during a motor vehicle stop in May, the incident was not captured on a body camera.

That’s because Wetzel wasn’t wearing one.

Wetzel is among a number of state police troopers on patrol duty who still have not been equipped with body cameras, according to the New Jersey Attorney General’s office.

“NJSP is currently in the process of outfitting all State Troopers on road patrol with body-worn cameras,” said Sharon Lauchaire, a spokesperson for state Attorney General Gurbir Grewal.

On Wednesday, New Jersey reported 611 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 and an additional 74 deaths from the virus.

The new statewide totals are 165,346 cases and 12,377 mortalities.

The state hospital association reported 1,701 hospitalizations as of 10:30 p.m. Tuesday; a net reduction of 15 hospitalizations.

The number of patients in intensive care decreased by 30 to a total of 471.

Training begins for additional contact tracers

On Tuesday, New Jersey reported 375 new confirmed cases of COVID-19 and an additional 91 deaths from the virus.

The new statewide totals are 164,796 cases and 12,303 mortalities.

The state hospital association reported 1,736 hospitalizations as of 10 p.m. Monday; a net reduction of four hospitalizations.

The number of patients in intensive care increased by 12 to a total of 510.

Stay-at-home order lifted

Gov. Phil Murphy lifted the state’s stay-at-home order Tuesday.

Newly released dashcam video shows the final moments before an unarmed Black man was fatally shot by a New Jersey State Trooper in the early hours of May 23.

Sgt. Randall Wetzel, who is white, shot Maurice S. Gordon, who is Black, after the two got into an altercation during a traffic stop on the Garden State Parkway in Bass River, Burlington County.

Gordon, 28, of Poughkeepsie, N.Y., later died.

Coronavirus update: N.J. Assembly approves $5 billion borrowing plan

Jun 5, 2020

New Jersey reported another 603 cases of coronavirus on Thursday, bringing the state’s cumulative count of infected residents to 162,530.

The state lost another 92 residents to complications from COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 11,970 lives lost.

Assembly approves $5 billion borrowing plan

The New Jersey Assembly approved a plan Thursday that will allow Gov. Phil Murphy to borrow $5 billion or more to prop up the state’s finances, which have been battered by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Barring a “precipitous backslide” in COVID-19 cases, New Jersey restaurants can offer outdoor dining and nonessential retail businesses can reopen their doors starting June 15, Gov. Phil Murphy announced Monday.

A week later, on June 22, salons and barbershops can again serve customers, Murphy said, while gyms and health clubs can reopen sometime after that.

All will likely face capacity limits and be required to make other adjustments, such as using paper menus or performing temperature checks at the door, the Democratic governor said.

New Jersey announced another 1,261 cases of coronavirus on Thursday, bringing the state’s total count of positive cases to 157,815.

Another 66 New Jerseyans died from complications of COVID-19. The state has now lost 11,401 to the outbreak.

State releases guidance on school graduations

Gov. Phil Murphy’s administration late Wednesday released guidance for how schools across New Jersey can hold modified in-person graduation ceremonies this year, as the state continues to deal with one of the worst COVID-19 outbreaks in the country.

New Jersey reported 703 new coronavirus cases Tuesday, bringing the state’s total to 155,764.

Another 54 people died of complications from COVID-19. The state has now lost 11,191 residents to the pandemic.

N.J. to allow outdoor graduations

Starting July 6, New Jersey schools and colleges can hold outdoor graduation ceremonies “that comply with social distancing,” Gov. Phil Murphy said Tuesday.

In his 13 years working as a bartender at Harrah’s casino in Atlantic City, Jason McKnight has just about seen it all.

“Shakeups and downturns and expansion of gaming in other states and the list goes on,” he said. “I mean, you name it, we’ve done it.”

But in his estimation, nothing compares to the threat COVID-19 poses to the iconic resort town.

“This one’s on another level,” he said. “We don’t know if people are going to just flock back in like nothing happened, or if people are going to be very scared and very wary to be around that many people.”

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