Jason Moran

Paula Court / Whitney Museum of American Art

Pianist-composer Jason Moran has formed many relationships with visual artists over the last two decades, from Joan Jonas to Adrian Piper to Glenn Ligon. He’s now joining their ranks with a solo exhibition at The Whitney Museum of American Art.

Jason Moran, as the show is simply titled, opened today and will run through Jan. 5, 2020. Earlier this week, Nate Chinen spoke with Moran and curator Danielle Edwards for WBGO News.

Autumn brings a cornucopia for jazz fans. 

Must-have albums, can’t-miss festivals, sounds both old and new. WBGO has gathered 88 highlights for your enjoyment, with expert commentary. (Pumpkin spice sold separately.)

The National Endowment for the Arts honors the 2019 NEA Jazz Masters with a tribute concert tonight at 8 p.m.

We'll host a live webcast from the John F. Kennedy Center For the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. The concert will be hosted by Jason Moran, with musical direction by Terri Lyne Carrington.

There are four NEA Jazz Masters in the 2019 class: pianist and composer Abdullah Ibrahim, composer Maria Schneider, critic-historian Stanley Crouch, and pianist and singer-songwriter Bob Dorough, who receives his award posthumously.

Peter Gannushkin / downtownmusic.net

It’s taken decades for Jason Moran to understand the artistry of Cecil Taylor, the brilliant American pianist who left us last Thursday, on April 5. A few years ago, The Checkout visited Moran’s New York studio to celebrate the visionary iconoclastic artist, just before paying homage at Harlem Stage.

 

On this very special Checkout podcast, Moran reflects on his hero in conversation, then honors him in performance. 

Jacob Blickenstaff

François Moutin & Kavita Shah, "You Go to My Head"

If you keep up with the modern-jazz mainstream in New York, you probably know François Moutin as a bassist who combines quicksilver agility with growling combustion. You may not yet be familiar with Kavita Shah, a singer grounded in the fundamentals but also brimming with fresh ideas.

Jean-Pierre Leloir

Holiday shopping, or a personal splurge? Here are five good reasons to spend your money.

Keystone / Getty Images

Dizzy Gillespie, “Long Long Summer”

I listened to hours and hours of Dizzy Gillespie over the weekend — not an unprecedented act, though it carried a little more purpose than usual. That’s because Gillespie, the immortal trumpeter, composer-bandleader and bebop progenitor, had his centenary on Saturday.

Steve Mundinger / Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz

Thelonious Monk, the incomparably influential jazz composer and pianist, would have turned 100 today, and across the country, a healthy range of commemorative tributes is already underway. But the flagship event that bears his name has quietly been put on hold: the next Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition, which at one point had been scheduled for this week at the Kennedy Center in Washington, will not happen in 2017.

Kendrick Scott opened his first set on Tuesday night, at the Jazz Standard in New York City, with a pensive new composition titled "Home." It had a bittersweet melody, a waft of dark harmony, and a beat defined both by chop and flow. "I'm just going to send this out as a meditation for everybody in Houston, Texas right now," said Scott, a drummer, as he introduced the tune.

Dorothy Darr

"I've got a pocketful of blues here still, you know?" says Charles Lloyd, the saxophonist-flutist-composer-bandleader who, at 79, has become one of jazz's enlightened elders.

Dorothy Darr

Saxophonist and flutist Charles Lloyd has led some rather spectacular bands over the years — from his heralded late-1960s quartet to the Marvels, his current group with guitarist Bill Frisell. Passin’ Thru, due out on Blue Note on July 14, captures the unique intensity of the Charles Lloyd New Quartet, a decade-long proposition with Jason Moran on piano, Reuben Rogers on bass and Eric Harland on drums. 

John Rogers

Take Five this week turns out to be a celebration of working bands — from the Bandwagon, led for more than a dozen years by pianist Jason Moran, to Natural Information Society, which bassist Joshua Abrams established not quite a decade ago. We'll also hear brand-new tracks by the Tomasz Stanko New York Quartet, a new-breed organ trio called Hearing Things, and the agile group led by bassist Linda May Han Oh.

Jazz Night in America: Muldrow Meets Mingus

Mar 23, 2017
Jason Moran (left) and Georgia Anne Muldrow celebrate Charles Mingus during a program at the Kennedy Center.
Jati Lindsay/Courtesy of the Kennedy Center

At a glance, Georgia Anne Muldrow isn't the obvious pick to create an interpretive tribute to the bassist and composer Charles Mingus. She was born in 1983, four years after Mingus died at 56. Her music stands well outside the jazz perimeter, aligning more with the Afrocentric current that flows through underground hip-hop, avant-R&B and psychedelic soul. She isn't a bassist like Mingus, but rather a singer, rapper and beat-making producer. Her village elders include the rapper Mos Def, the producer Madlib and the vocalist Erykah Badu.

The Jason Moran/Robert Glasper Double Trio performs at 713->212: Houstonians in NYC. Recorded January 15, 2011 at 92YTribeca. 

Personnel:

Jason Moran - Fender Rhodes
Robert Glasper - piano
Alan Hampton - acoustic bass
Mark Kelley - electric bass
Chris Dave - drums
Eric Harland - drums 

Producer: Josh Jackson
Mix: David Tallacksen
Assisted by Michael Downes and Michael McGoff