Census 2020

Ang Santos / WBGO

The US Census Bureau is hosting community job hiring events as part of its National Recruiting Week, where census officials engage with people interested in positions and the application process.  

npr.org

Ang Santos:  The Trump administration has decided to print 2020 census forms without a citizenship question.  The move comes days after the Supreme Court ruled to keep the question off census forms, and just a day after printing was scheduled to begin for 1.5 billion paper forms, letters and other mailings.  With us on the phone we have co-chair and founder of the House Census Caucus, Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney of New York.  Thanks for taking some time to speak with us. 

Rep. Carolyn Maloney:  I’m delighted to be here.

Ang Santos / WBGO

New Jersey advocates are celebrating the US Supreme Court’s move to keep the Trump Administration from adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census, but still have lingering concerns about achieving an accurate count.

Patricia Williamson with the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice says the citizenship question was presented to make the most vulnerable of residents’ invisible.

Ang Santos / WBGO

2010 Census statistics show most children under age 5 that weren’t counted live in what’s called “hard to count” areas.  Experts say these are generally majority minority, low poverty municipalities.

“I can say that my wife and I are taking it so seriously, that since the last census count, we’ve had three children,” said Paterson Mayor Andre Sayegh, who jokes about it but understands that his city has one of the largest populations of undercounted children in New Jersey.  That’s why Paterson created a Complete Count Committee.

New York City Commissioner of both the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, and Consumer Affairs Julie Menin has been appointed to direct outreach efforts for the upcoming 2020 Census.  

“There are literally billions of dollars that flow or don’t flow according to the census,” said New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.  “Money that comes down to whether people have health care or food, opportunity or safety, or not.  It comes down to whether we have proper representation in Congress.”