Blues

Courtesy of the artist

Lucky Peterson, a keyboardist, guitarist and singer whose blues career kicked off with a novelty hit at age 5, eventually sprawling over dozens of albums and thousands of high-octane gigs, died in Dallas, Tx. on May 17. He was 55.

His death was announced on his Facebook page. Blues guitarist Shawn Kellerman, his longtime friend and band mate, said the cause was a stroke.

Courtesy of the artist

Christone “Kingfish” Ingram is the brightest young artist erupting on the Blues scene today. 

He’s from Clarksdale, Miss., ground zero of the Delta blues. He grew up near the crossroads where Robert Johnson legendarily sold his soul in a guitar showdown with the Devil, and he plays so fiercely it’s often wondered whether Kingfish is likewise musically hellbound.

WBGO

WBGO's blues hosts, Michael Bourne and Bob Porter, ring in the new year with their favorite blues tunes of 2018.


courtesy of Delmark

Earlier this month it was announced that Delmark Records, a Chicago blues and jazz institution, had been sold to new owners. WBGO's Bob Porter offers a reflection on the news, and a look back at his friendship with Delmark founder Bob Koester.

ERIKA GOLDRING / GETTY IMAGES FOR PILGRIMAGE MUSIC & CULTURAL FESTIVAL

 

The blues have traveled far and wide over the last century — exerting a vast cultural influence worldwide, yielding myriad offshoots, and generating fortunes for some of the biggest musical acts of our time. But it's also still the product of local conditions, and bound by hardscrabble local concerns.

 

Rob Paparozzi is a virtuoso of the harmonica, and played a box full of harps — different sizes, different keys — when he came to WBGO for a talk on Michael Bourne’s Blues Break. He’ll be the featured soloist on May 11 when the New York Philharmonic performs Henry Mancini’s score to Breakfast at Tiffany’s, along with a screening of the film.

 

Paparozzi recently played in the City Center Encores revival of Roger Miller’s musical Big River: Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He’s also performing with a reunited Blues Brothers band. 

Bobby Rush is one of the last living blues legends of his generation. He toured the South and the chitlin' circuit in the '50s and was often forced to perform music behind a curtain for white audiences. Shortly before the Montgomery Bus Boycott, Rush heard through fellow Chicago bluesman J.B.