compositions

Great Live Moments - Jim Hall

Guitarist Jim Hall is the embodiment of what makes jazz special. First of all, there's something so absolutely honest about his music. If you need proof that Hall is the greatest living jazz guitarist, ask Pat Metheny. Or Bill Frisell. Or John Scofield. They will tell you that Jim Hall is their guy. I suspect musicians admire Jim for many of the reasons that we do.  Chiefly, Hall's asset is his ability to listen to the other band members. Just imagine all those Jim Hall duets with Bill Evans, Ron Carter, or any number of guitarists, not to mention his ensemble playing with Sonny Rollins... "Down From Antigua" is one of Jim Hall's trademark compositions. As many times as I've heard this tune, it still sounds fresh.
WBGO recorded the Jim Hall Trio at The Jazz Forum, February 5, 1983.
They are:
Jim Hall, guitar
Harvie Swartz - bass
Ben Riley - drums

Listen to "Down From Antigua" from the WBGO Archives.
-Josh

JazzSet: The Keys to New Orleans

Henry Butler Photo
JazzSet recorded the "Keys to New Orleans" concert, featuring pianists Jon Cleary, Henry Butler and Allen Toussaint, at the Kennedy Center on November 9. Mark Schramm was our onsite producer, Duke Markos at the recording console. Mark says the music was FANTASTIC, and more.

"Jon Cleary got us off to great start with his fast-moving set of short tunes, a mix of originals and Bayou classics. He plays and sings with great spirit. Infectious!"

"Henry Butler! Man, what an INCREDIBLE talent. He PLAYS the piano, the whole instrument -- what a left hand! He did a couple of his own tunes, and then (touchingly) one of Allen's compositions, 'Workin' in the Coal Mine.' Allen was and is an inspiration for Henry. They have a warm relationship on and off the stand. Henry sings in a deep, rich baritone."

Listen to Henry Butler play "Workin' in the Coal Mine."

"And then there was Allen. What can you say? The man is a legend for a reason. He opened both sets with two of his tunes, 'We are America' and 'Yes We Can,' which seemed appropriate given the setting and timing of this concert. Henry joined Allen for a little four-hand piano on Allen's tune 'Mr. Mardi Gras,' and Allen gave out some mardi gras presents to the audience while Henry played solo. Allen finished both his sets with extended versions of 'Southern Night' -- he painted a lovely picture of growing up in New Orleans, the people, the houses, the streets -- wonderful storytelling, and then the familiar song itself to finish up."

Catch the full set on JazzSet in early 2009! In Surround Sound.

Tribute to Teo Macero - May 18th at NYU

Teo Macero, 1998 by Alan Nahagian
Long before the digital era and its master manipulators - Brian Eno, J Dilla et al - producer Teo Macero was splicing analog reels from various Miles Davis sessions, creating the sonic tapestry of Miles' early electric style.  The saxophonist, composer, and master of the razor blade will be remembered at a memorial service this Sunday, May 18 at NYU’s Loewe Theatre, 35 West 4th Street, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. The event is open to the public.

Macero spent his later years in semi-retirement, occasionally helping the NYU Jazz Program. He produced two CD’s with the NYU Jazz Orchestra featuring his original compositions.  Special guest soloists will join the NYU Jazz Orchestra for the memorial.
-Josh