WBGO Blog
  • MONTREAL JAZZFEST 2015, Day 4

    June 30, 2015. Posted by Michael Bourne.

    Add new comment | Filed under: FIJM, FIJM 2015

    11AM...Festival day begins with the presentation of the FIJM audiovisual archives, including 2660 videos from 30 years of concerts, interviews, and much more from the festival,  to the Biblioteque et archive nationales de Quebec...a.k.a. the BAnQ.  Includes the performance of the first featured artist in 1980, Ray Charles.  Also the first filmed concerts of Diana Krall, Pat Metheny, and the Marsalis Brothers.  Festival legends Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, and Dave Brubeck.  Montreal jazz icons Oscar Peterson, Oliver Jones, and Vic Vogel.  Not only is the collection a history of this wonderful jazzfest, it's also a wonderful history of this musical art.

    NOON ... overcast -- but blue sky is breaking through!  And down below the window, the musical day begins with the Jazzfest des Jeunes (Jazzfest of Kids).   Today's "jeunes" come from the high school of Neufchatel, Quebec.   It's a jazz big band but they play plenty of R&B.  "Pick Up the Pieces" picks me up.

    1PM ... drizzle -- and the break of blue sky is swallowed by grey clouds ... umbrellas below, but a New Orleans marching band band plays on.

    2PM ... drizzle done, clouds turning white, sun shining through ... time for a pizza.

    I am a creature of ritual, especially in Montreal.  One of my first (and favorite) rituals for several years has been to immediately have a pizza with Vincent Lefebvre, FIJM wrangler of the international media and a good friend.  We always have gone to one of my favorite pizza joints in the world, each somewhat different, all called Pizzedelic.  They used to have four around town, but the one on St. Laurent and the one on St. Denis closed last year, and now the one across from the Notre Dame basilica, the one where the WBGO trippers have gone with me, the one Vincent and I considered our Pizzedelic is gone!  Only open now is the one farthest away from the jazzfest, the one on Montroyal Est -- and we couldn't get there when I got here!

    Michael's enjoys Pizzadelic/credit: Michael Bourne
    Michael enjoys Pizzadelic/credit: Michael Bourne

    After four days without, at last I taxi'd there and was happier than all the little kids at tables around me coloring cartoons on the menu.   Years ago, when I first discovered the Pizzedelic up the hill from the jazzfest on St. Laurent, they didn't have a menu.  Menu items were printed on several strips of plastic, including one with all the stuff you can have on your pizza.  Back then, you could get a pizza with snails!  Since then, they've offered a variety of mixed and matched toppings, not including snails anymore.  You can get a square and thin pie crust now that's gluten-free.  I care only that I can get just the right gathering of toppings.  I sometimes start with a basic pepperoni Americain, or maybe chevre et noix (goat cheese and walnuts).  I opted as my first pizza of 2015 to start with black olives, mozzarella and feta cheese, plus my favorite extra, saucisson Calabrese, a wide-sliced spicy salami.  I added also even spicier chorizo and artichokes.   All the better with a pint of red ale, Boreale rousse.

    Not to forget, music also was happening at Festival international de JAZZ de Montreal.

    5PM: judging at the "Casino" -- a trombone/bass/drums trio.

    Michael Bourne, in floral, at the judging table/credit: Victor Diaz Lamich
    Michael Bourne, in floral, at the judging table/credit: Victor Diaz Lamich

    5:30: a group called Swing Connection, kids  that teach swing dancing with a band every week, dancing in the street again to Pops and Basie's "Every Tub."

    6PM: guitarist Kurt Rosenwinkel at the Gesu with a quartet: Aaron Parks on piano, Eric Revis on bass, Allan Mednard on drums.  They played some of the most pure and powerful melodies I've heard.  Not so much the usual song forms, Rosenwinkel's melodies sound romantic but often with a rock intensity, melodies that I scribbled in the dark "rush like a river."  Rosenwinkel creates that much more of a unique sound scatting his voice electronically with his strings ringing.  "Samba" by Rosenwinkel blew the roof off.  "Ballade" by Parks was exquisite.   Rosenwinkel is playing one of this year's FIJM "Invitation" series of concerts, tomorrow playing solo.

    7:30: folks bouncing to a klezmer band in the beer tent, folks cheering with a circus band in the street.

    Music in the streets/credit: Benoit Rousseau
    Music in the streets/credit: Benoit Rousseau

    8PM: John Scofield and Joe Lovano at the Maisoneuve, reunited after more than a decade.  Larry Grenadier on bass.  Bill Stewart on drums.  I've always heard the DNA of Ornette Coleman when Sco and Joe have played together, and I could hear it right away as they came out ramblin' -- Joe's "Cymbalism" indeed reminds me of Ornette's "Ramblin'."  Joe's sound on the tenor sax is always big and soulful.  So is his presence on the stage.  When he solos, he dances.  John's sound on the guitar is uniquely lyrical.  In each note that he plays, you can hear the very steel of his strings singing.  They played Joe's tribute to Ornette and tunes they've recorded on an album that comes out in October,  called "Past and Present."  They climaxed with Bill Stewart exploding (felt like rhythmic shrapnel) on Sco's barndance-on-acid romper "Chap Dance."  They encored with the blues.

    10PM:  I missed another master of the guitar, Bill Frisell.  Always so much happening in Montreal.  Often all at once at FIJM.  Sorry to have missed saxophonist Jane Bunnett with the Cuban singers called Maqueque.  Alex Pangman, called in the jazzfest program "the darling of Canadian swing, " was s(w)inging on the big RTA free stage.  I heard only "The World Is Waiting for the Sunrise."

    credit: Denis Alix
    Heads of State/credit: Denis Alix

    10:30:  Heads of State at the Gesu, masters all.  Gary Bartz on soprano & alto sax.  Larry Willis, piano.  Buster Williams, bass.  Al Foster, drums.  Bartz, playing by himself, opened with a quietly enthralling "I Wish I Knew."   Bartz, as a charming MC, was delighted that the Montreal audience is so enthusiastic.   "I feel like we're in church," he said -- which the Gesu (French for Jesus) indeed is.   They played McCoy Tyner's "Passion Dance" and (title track on the new album, added just today at wbgo.org/radar) "Search For Peace,"  John Coltrane's "Impressions," Bartz's "Uncle Bubba," and one of Buster's hip re-arrangements of a standard, Cole Porter's "All of You."  These cats know how.

  • Montreal Jazzfest 2015, Day 3

    June 29, 2015. Posted by Michael Bourne.

    Add new comment | Filed under: FIJM, FIJM 2015

    RAIN ...

    rain
    credit: Frederique Menard-Aubin

    Cold.

    credit: Victor Diaz Lamich
    credit: Victor Diaz Lamich

    Wet.

    VDL2673
    credit: Victor Diaz Lamich

    Most of the outdoor concerts were cancelled. Only groups on stages with canopies were playing. Only festgoers huddled under umbrellas were listening. But the music kept them smiling.

    credit: Frederique Menard-Aubin
    credit: Frederique Menard-Aubin
  • MONTREAL JAZZFEST 2015, Day 2

    June 29, 2015. Posted by Michael Bourne.

    Add new comment | Filed under: FIJM, FIJM 2015
    Benoit Rousseau_FIJM_Ambiance-7717
    credit: Benoit Rousseau

    Rio Tinto Alcan mines and sells aluminum world-wide. They've been a leading sponsor of the jazzfest for years. Their name is on the Maison du Festival, HQ of the indefatigable FIJM press corps and where the jazzfest operates year-round a jazz joint called L'Astral, a restaurant, a mediateque with countless hours of festival videos, and the Bell-sponsored jazzfest museum -- highlighted by the very piano Oscar Peterson and Oliver Jones learned to play on.
    Scene Rio Tinto Alcan is a big stage right below my window in the Hyatt. While blogging and what-not, "Messin' with the Kid," the classic blues of Junior Wells, was rocking down below, played by Les Pros du Camp de Blues.

    Music happens freely from noon to midnight on the outdoor festival stages all around Place des Arts.   Mountebanks also perform, a reminder that Cirque du Soleil comes from Montreal and that a circus festival is coincidentally happening in the "City of Festivals."  I haven't seen fire-eaters yet , but on two light poles, I watched young women climb and contort into pretzels, one hanging or twisting around a white rope, the other whirling in an enormous purple sling.  And nearby, two brightly-feathered long-necked firebirds were bopping.  On stilts.

    Dancing in the street happens every which way around the jazzfest.  I walk by the Heineken "Lounge" (it's a tent) and a group is playing a sweetly swinging "Blue Monk" as 4 or 5 couples dance cheek to cheek.  I turn the corner and, in a bicycle lane alongside an open pub,  8 or 9 teenagers are line-jitterbugging to Pops singing "Hello Dolly."  And on the CBC Radio blues stage, the Jake Chisolm band from Ontario is playing "Work Song."

    credit: Frédérique Ménard-Aubin
    credit: Frédérique Ménard-Aubin

    Thousands of folks meander the festival.  Eating.  Drinking.  Dancing.  Listening.  Eating more.  What was once Avenue Jeanne-Mance on the east side of Place des Arts is now the jazzfest's main drag, Spectacle Deambulatoire.  President Kennedy Avenue, the upper perimeter of the festival, is another major thoroughfare that's been shut down. Where traffic is usually rolling, folks are eating empanadas (Angus or veggie) at a make-shift shack called Atelier d'Argentine.  Or tacos from the tent down the block.  That the city transforms everyday active streets into two weeks of the festival grounds is the most obvious show of how much FIJM means to Montreal.

    Club Jazz Casino de Montreal a la Place SNC-Lavalin is a long name for the parking lot of the fortress-like tower that is engineering magnate SNC-Lavalin.  "They build...everything," a VP said.  They've loaned the space for the an outdoor bandstand -- where we judges heard the first of ten bands in the Grand Prix TD competition.  We were first supposed to sit in the front row, and we only listen to the first 30 minutes.  I observed that the musicians are already nervous.  Seeing the judges scribbling notes will make them even moreso.  And then we walk out!  So, we were relocated to the back of the "Casino"  and saxophonist Andy King played first.  With nine to go.

    credit: Frederique Aubin
    credit: Frederique Aubin

    I always remember the music.  I cannot always remember when I heard the music.  I cannot remember at which of the 23 Montreal jazzfests I've attended, but I'll always remember a gig trumpeter Enrico Rava played at the Spectrum, a now-long-gone cabaret on Ste Cat.  Playing trombone in Rava's quintet was Gianluca Petrella.  His sound was golden.  His playing was surprising.  And nonetheless is.  Petrella's duets with trumpeter Paolo Fresu last night were intimate and ethereal.  Petrella's duets with pianist Giovanni Guidi tonight were ... not argumentative, but an intense call and response.  Or, really, response and response.  Whimsical themes and grooves rumbling against and atop each other.  I've often said that the trombone sounds to me the instrument most like a human voice, and when Petrella plays he sounds to me as if he's singing.  Or, really, speaking.  Words, I mean.   Not that I know what he's saying -- he's speaking Italian -- but he's saying something, quite often funny.  And the same for Enrico Rava.   Like so many of the Italian cats I've heard in Montreal, Rava plays with (an Italian word that's now English) bravura. Italian cats at FIJM have been often also, somewhat ... wacky.  Rava's quintet played straightahead, swinging tunefully, and always with an echo of what sounds to me like Nino Rota's mirthful finale of 8 1/2.  Or, as I scribbled in my notebook, circus bebop ...

    Phronesis is a Greek word meaning practical wisdom.  Phronesis in jazz means the trio of British pianist Ivo Neame, Danish bassist Jasper Hoiby, and Swedish drummer Anton Eger.  They're witty, especially in the musings of Hoiby introducing the tunes.  They're kaleidoscopic, especially in the musical whirlwinds Eger whips up.  Eger plays around the drums so quickly that his solos sound legato -- as if breathtaking melodies.   Phronesis, like so many groups that end each evening at the Gesu, were serious fun.