WBGO Blog
  • About Last Night - SF Jazz Collective at SOPAC

    March 12, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    SF Jazz Collective - Live at SOPAC

    I am a city dweller, plagued by the New Yorker bias. That is, I very rarely go to New Jersey for anything other than to work at WBGO. However, I am not so entrenched that I won't shake my preconceptions for the right set of circumstances. So last night, I ventured to SOPAC for a performance from the SF Jazz Collective, a pride of eight musicians of the highest caliber.

    Each year, the collective features original commissions, as well as arrangements of a noted modern jazz composer. This season, the band turns their all-seeing eye on composer and saxophonist (and Newark native) Wayne Shorter.
    The end of time was the beginning of the set. Saxophonist Miguel Zenon's arrangement of Shorter's "Armegeddon" set us on the trailhead.
    Here's what followed:
    This That and the Other - a Joe Lovano original
    The Angel's Share - penned by Matt Penman, a New Zealand import
    Diana - from Shorter's Native Dancer, arranged by Renee Rosnes
    Go - Stefon Harris arranged this Shorter composition with some backbeat boom bap. Great way to end the first half.

    The second set pushed ahead into the abstract, modern aesthetic that makes the collective such a great band to hear. Drummer Eric Harland's "The Year 2008" set the tone, a composition built around a recorded vocal chant, Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech, and a reading of the Declaration of Independence. Rosnes' "Aurora Borealis" followed. Trumpeter Dave Douglas contributed "Secrets of the Code," an original work that used snippets of Wayne Shorter's music as source code embedded as a thread throughout the composition. Great stuff. The newest member of the collective, trombonist Robin Eubanks, ended the evening with his arrangement of Shorter's "Black Nile."

    Only two complaints. The piano monitor levels in the house made the trombone articulation inaudible. That's just the music nerd in me. The other issue is this: I could not hear all of the band's repertoire in a single night. The SF Jazz Collective had more music in the kitty, but I'll have to see them again to hear the rest. Will do.
    -Josh

  • More Notes From The Dennis Irwin Benefit

    March 11, 2008. Posted by Becca Pulliam.

    Dennis Irwin died at 3:30 yesterday afternoon. Four hours later, in the Allen Room at Jazz at Lincoln Center, Joe Lovano's band led off what was to have been a benefit concert. Like Dennis, Lovano's bassist Cameron Brown is white-haired and medium height -- a detail you notice with bassists. I wanted to believe he was Dennis. Wynton Marsalis spoke of Dennis's "most magnificent attitude." The rest of the night spoke to his most magnificent music. Among the moments, Bill Frisell's phrases and spaces evoking "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry," and Harry Allen and Joe Cohn's simple sax / guitar duo of "Body and Soul." David Berger told the story of Dennis coming to BAM to sub in the Harlem Nutcracker, a complicated, fast-paced score which Dennis virtually sightread. At the end of the first act, the band spontaneously gave the bassist a standing ovation. Dennis stayed in David's band for the next 11 years. Adorable in a tiny dress and high high heels, Aria Hendricks -- Dennis's love -- sang with her father Jon on "Doodlin'". Jon sang air bass on his solo.
    -Becca Pulliam

  • Notes From The Dennis Irwin Benefit

    March 10, 2008. Posted by Michael Bourne.

    I spent the whole show backstage. I didn't even realize that Dennis passed. It was only at the last when Aria Hendricks talked about Dennis before she sang "The Nearness of You" that I knew. None of the cats backstage were being mournful. Whenever anyone said anything about Dennis, it was a joyful story. I introduced Mose Allison in the concert, and when Mose was singing, John Scofield and others backstage remembered that Dennis knew all the lyrics to Mose's songs. I was amazed by the who's who backstage. I remember looking over and all the drummers were hanging out. Jack DeJohnette. Kenny Washington. Lewis Nash. Paul Motian. And then Matt Wilson walked by. They and all of the others at the concert knew, learned from, laughed with, loved, and were swung by Dennis Irwin.
    -MBourne

  • One love!

    February 6, 2008

    Robert Nesta Marley was born on this day (Feb 6) in 1945 in Jamaica, W.I. His friends called him Bob. He died in 1981. Simple math will tell you that he barely got a chance to live. But the music he crammed into his 36 years will outlive all of us.

    If all you know about Bob Marley is "I shot the Sheriff," I urge you to dig deeper. The man was one of the most eloquent and sensitive songwriters ever. Whether he was singing about the oppression of hate or the deliverance of love, his lyrics were simply - true. Marley is Dylan is Lennon and McCartney is Jagger and Richards and then some. But, as hip as those cats were, they still couldn't break it down like Bob.

    "I-and-I no come to fight flesh and blood, but spiritual wickedness in high and low places; so while they fight you down, stand firm and give Jah thanks and praises! I-and-I don't expect to be justified by the laws of men. Oh, You may find me guilty but truth, truth will prove my innocence. When the rain falls, it don't fall on one man's house. Just remember that!"

    You don't have to be a Rasta to dig that! Happy Birthday, Bob. This world misses you, bro. - David Cruz

  • Notes From the House Geek

    February 4, 2008. Posted by Amy Niles.

    I wear the title proudly. I wear a lot of hats here at WBGO- but this is my favorite one. While I am overseeing a number of the activities here at WBGO, I am sitting in my cold dark office ( no, they don't keep me in the fruit cellar!) and pouring over stats. Man, I love this stuff. Trying to understand more about our listeners and what they like ( don't ever be shy about telling us). Finding stats for our dynamic underwriting duo to use with potential sponsors ( they are one of the components along with your membership that keeps this station on the air and on the web). Just loving the fact that this station has grown from a signal in the Newark Public Schools and has expanded to include YOU- where ever you are in the world!

    I thought that I would share my new fascination:

    WHERE ARE YOU?

    We have all kinds of tools that tell us and I am obsessed with this stuff!

    Don't worry, we don't know exactly where you are. We are not going to come and visit like the Publishers Clearinghouse guys ( sorry to disappoint you!). We can only tell kinda sorta where you are- the country, state and city. Nothing creepy. We could speak in just about any language and someone in our audience would understand the words that we were saying- but you ALL understand the music.

    Did you know that the majority of you who listen online are in our terrestrial listening area?

    4 of you were listening from Botswana yesterday. And 4 from the Virgin Islands.

    5.1% of our US online audience yesterday was from California. And 2.6% came from Florida.

    OK, so now guess. Number one place outside of the US where people were listening-

    Japan.

    Who are all of you? Are you expats? How did you find WBGO? Are you members ( ok, so shoot me, I had to ask!)? Share something with the rest of us about what turns you on about this music. I am going to Japan in March- where should I go to hear jazz in Tokyo?

    Bottom line, you are a part of a great community, a party that goes where ever you do, whenever you want us. Thanks for joining us! And if you ever find yourself in Newark, feel free to come and visit us- we love having you.

    Amy- The House Geek