• 2009 IAJE Conference Canceled

    April 20, 2008. Posted by Angelika Beener.

    Sigh.  What a drag.  I was just talking to a friend and about this yesterday.  He was telling me that IAJE is where he first met mentors like Kenny Garrett, and the peers that he works with today.  It's sad for the jazz community at large, and for all it means to the young upcoming musicians.  A personal sense of loss for sure.  Details are below...

    Friday, April 18, 2008

    American jazz gathering, planned for Seattle, is canceled

    By Paul de Barros

    Seattle Times jazz critic

    The most important American jazz gathering of the year, scheduled to take place in Seattle in January, has been canceled because its presenter is declaring bankruptcy.

    In what is being described as a "perfect storm" of bad luck, unchecked growth, fundraising and management failures, the International Association for Jazz Education (IAJE) - an important link to Seattle's successful school jazz-band scene - has collapsed.

    According to IAJE's legal counsel, Alan Bergman, it will go into Chapter 7 bankruptcy and be turned over to a trustee, its assets parceled out to creditors.

    A letter from the group's president, Chuck Owen, is scheduled to go out to members as early as today, announcing the bankruptcy - and essentially the dissolution - of the 40-year-old organization.

    "It's a dark day," said band director Clarence Acox, whose award-winning Garfield High School jazz band has performed at IAJE's gathering four times.

    "It's one of the best jazz events in the world, for the performances by great musicians, clinics, meetings, a place for people to network and exchange ideas. It was the one event when all the people in jazz could get together and have fellowship."

    Roosevelt High School band director Scott Brown, whose band has played the conference as well, agreed.

    "I'm bummed," said Brown. "We had hoped to perform, but it's way more global than that. It's exposure to so much music that's going on around the world, to information about the business, networking, clinicians."

    IAJE meets in different cities each year, but often in New York.

    It began in 1968 as a modest professional gathering of jazz-music teachers, holding its first conference in 1973.

    In 1997, the conference embraced an "industry track," absorbing another convention previously sponsored by JazzTimes magazine, which brought in record companies, agents, managers, radio professionals and high-profile performers such as Herbie Hancock and Quincy Jones.

    Since then, the organization has formed chapters worldwide and has become the site for the National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Masters Awards ceremony; commissions of new works; an academic conference; programs to promote women in jazz; and a wide array of other programs, including a teacher-training institute.

    In a good year, the conference attracts 7,000 to 8,000 people, a must-attend for anyone involved in jazz.

    Rumors that the organization was in trouble surfaced after this year's dramatically underattended conference in Toronto, down 40 percent.

    In a March 25 letter to 8,000 members, Owen announced the suspension of IAJE's magazine, its search for a new executive director, its scholarship programs and its summer retreat.

    The letter also explained that the organization's ambitious capital campaign had spent more money in startup costs than it took in.

    Owen asked members to donate $25 and netted about $12,000 from 250 donors, according to Bergman. Greg Yasinitzy, IAJE's Northwest division coordinator, said he had been told IAJE liabilities exceeded $1 million.

    Bergman said he felt the organization's rapid growth had outstripped the expertise of its founders.

    "A bunch of jazz musicians formed this organization and it grew into a multimillion-dollar operation with a huge convention and a big staff and big journal, but it was still run by a volunteer board elected by the membership that met twice a year."

    Though the conference in Seattle has been canceled, there is already talk of a regional conference that may take place instead.

    Copyright © 2008 The Seattle Times Company

  • Jazzy Music Teacher Winner Announced!

    April 9, 2008

    2008 Jazzy Music Teacher Contest winner Tamah Freni with Mark Gross and Gary WalkerI've just put up a page on the website announcing the winner of the Jazzy Music Teacher Contest. Congratulations to Tamah Freni and her students!

    Find out how the whole thing happened.

  • Marcus Strickland on We Insist: Jazz Speaks Out

    April 4, 2008. Posted by Angelika Beener.


    Not too long ago, I had the pleasure of interviewing a dear friend and an overwhelmingly talented musician.  Marcus Strickland, winner of the 2006 Jazz Times Reader's poll for Artist of the Year, is a unique and special artist.

    On this episode of We Insist: Jazz Speaks Out, we discuss the role of jazz in the "X" generation, and the new roles jazz musicians have to take in being proactive int heir careers, in the ever-evolving record business.    Marcus talks about his new album Open Reel Deck his work with musicians outside of the jazz community and how hip-hop is influencing his music more than ever.  He also discusses the idea of "young lions" in jazz, and how it's really not so different from Charlie Parker, and Trane.  This was a great interview.  Check it out.


    April 1, 2008. Posted by Stevan Smith.

    This edition celebrates: Bobbi Humphrey- Blacks and Blues (1973)

    01. Chicago, Damn
    02. Harlem River Drive
    03. Just a Love Child
    04. Blacks and Blues
    05. Jasper Country Man
    06. Baby's Gone

    A true jazz-funk classic, and Humphrey's biggest hit, Blacks and Blues is a lesson in "cool jazz". Composed, produced, and partly arranged by the fantastic Mizell brothers (Larry & Fonce), this is an Lp that trend sends generations. Humphrey is never drowned out by her collaborators. Her performance as flautist (if you didn't know) fits snug in each melodic masterpiece. Bobbi even makes her vocal debut on the tracks, "Just A Love Child" and "Baby's Gone".

    "....Yeah, it's kind of like that".

    Some of my favorite tracks include "Chicago, Damn", "Harlem River Drive", and the title-track "Blacks and Blues".

    Here is an updated version of "Harlem River Drive" (Sorry no embed available). This had to be the late 80's or early 90's. Lol.

    Look what else I found: [display_podcast]

    Though this is not an album that would delight a purist, it is an excellent addition to any jazz collection. The moods are laid-back, soothing, and romantic. This is in heavy rotation on my (insert plug). If you haven't had the opportunity to check this album out. Please do. It is worth every minute (hint...ladies...hint...fellas).

    Perfect soundtrack for the Spring weather....well when it finally gets here.


  • Dr. Billy Taylor's Online Video Archive

    March 6, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Dr. Billy Taylor, at 86, is still a great broadcaster. The good doctor has been spreading the jazz message on multiple broadcast platforms for more than half a century. In the 1950s, he was one of the first jazz musicians to have a daily radio program. He also hosted a weekly television show, The Subject is Jazz. He was the jazz correspondent on CBS Sunday Morning. He hosted two NPR programs, Jazz Alive and Jazz at the Kennedy Center. He founded Jazzmobile. And he's had a web presence for the last seven years. Dr. Billy Taylor's website now includes many classic videos culled from an extraordinary life in jazz. Here's one of the many gems you'll discover - a performance with Billy Taylor, Duke Ellington and Willie "The Lion" Smith:


    While you're here, dig this interview with Dr. Taylor and WBGO's Gary Walker.