Stefanie Fernández

This week, there's something new for every corner of the Latinternet. On the pop music front, Nicky Jam brought on Bad Bunny and Arcangel for "Satisfacción," proving themselves some of the busiest Latinos in music this summer. Internet kids Cuco and Clairo teamed up for a sweet trying-to-appear-older track because the law virtually required it, Miguel leaned in further to his Afro-Mexican roots on a Spanish version of "Banana Clip," and Ivy Queen tore a vicious vecina to shreds with a hilarious diss track.

As part of Turning the Tables, NPR Music compiled a list of 200 greatest songs by women and non-binary artists in the 21st Century.

This week, we heard a lot of great music from up-and-comers of every genre, from Puerto Rican trap-makers Bryant Myers' and Bad Bunny's sad boy jam "Triste" to the slow-and-sultry, Barry White-inspired stylings of Jesse Baez.

9 a.m. Friday. Miami. You're stuck on the Palmetto Expressway, already late to your "minimum" "wage" desk job when you get a call: Sofi, your Soulcycling best friend with the ever-perfect manicure. "Muchaaaacha! Where are you?" she says. Her tío is out of town and lent her the boat. Juanchi, the dude you've had your eye on who resembles Maluma in abs, tiny man-bun and net worth, will be there. WYD?

This week, the music got intense. With "Pienso En Tu Mirá," 24-year-old flamenco singer Rosalía is proving to be one of the most inventive young players in Latin music ahead of her second album El Mal Querer, a more polished and produced genre experiment than her strictly acoustic debut album, 2017's Los Angeles.

Jeff Rosenstock has always made music for the slow days after the end-times, and "All This Useless Energy" is a kick-the-can punk ballad for crawling out of aimlessness toward a purpose.

This week, musicians all over Latin America asked a lot of questions. Mala Rodríguez's first solo song since 2013 leads with the question, "Who protects me?" For La Mala, the question comes from an empowered, long-scorned woman. Gaby Moreno asks the same question, but for Central American immigrants. Other truth-seekers this week: New York-based Mexican singer Marrón offers a breezy respite and Cuban reggaeton (read: Cubaton) singer El Micha wants you to stop lying to yourself.

As the temperature outside climbs well into the 90s, we're getting a bit restless. Luckily, this week Bad Bunny released not one but two bangers to keep us moving, and his collaborator, Arcangel's old other-half De La Ghetto, released a love bop with Maluma and Wisin that will make you yearn for the simpler romances of childhood. Meanwhile, L.A. hometown heroes Inner Wave provide a silky synth wave ballad that will make you want to fall in love in someone's Honda Civic.

Friends, a lot happened over the weekend. On Friday, Luis Fonsi proved once again that he can get millions of views with a well-drawled ayyyyy on any given beach in Puerto Rico; this time, he got an unexpected assist from U.K. grime star Stefflon Don. On Saturday, Daddy Yankee recruited the recently reunited old-school duo R.K.M. and Ken-Y for another go at it, now that reggaeton seems to (finally) be having its mainstream moment.

For Latinos all over the world, the arrival of summer can mean a lot of things: piraguas, block parties, backyard-grown tropical fruit sold out of the trunks of cars. This year in the music world, summer means the return of Cuban hip-hop trio Orishas after a 10-year hiatus, la reina Ivy Queen's contribution to reggaeton season, Dos Santos' psychedelic cumbia funk and more.

In the history of world domination schemes, there hasn't been a conqueror that took over the Earth in Spanish since Christopher Columbus. J Balvin is ready to reclaim the music world for his people.

Hell is real and L.A. punk band Hit Bargain has been there. It's in Ohio.

It would be easy to call Peach Kelli Pop's bright and frenetic music bubblegum or twee, but it would also be wrong. To refer to a song like "Hello Kitty Knife" this way removes the agency and intention that makes it so earnest. The first single off the band's upcoming fourth album Gentle Leader is at once a more maturely written song than previous work and a return to childhood.

You know the kinds of teens and 20-somethings who listened to PJ Harvey and Sleater-Kinney and wore Mary-Jane Doc Martens with socks? The cool ones in those art films you saw in high school?

On the 2017 debut Jump Ship, No Thank You frontwoman Kaytee Della Monica offered the kind of millennial snark heard from the edge of a cigarette with lyrics like "Still listen to Nimrod when I'm getting high / I'm twenty something, I'm doing just fine."

Disney's latest summer reading list adaptation A Wrinkle in Time is being hailed and expected to set the box office aflurry. A big-screen (and big-budget) adaptation of the 1962 novel by Madeleine L'Engle, A Wrinkle in Time follows a young girl through inter-dimensional time and space to find her missing father. It's a coming-of-age story bundled in a sci-fi odyssey, tied up with a $100 million bow.

If your mom's favorite telenovela met The Love Witch, the resulting TV movie would be La Luz's video for "Cicada." After 2015's Charles Burns-inspired Weirdo Shrine, "Cicada" is the first single off the L.A. band's upcoming album Floating Features, and builds on its noir foundations with a sunny edge.

On first glance, Omar Banos appears to be a normal kid. The 19-year-old Mexican-American from Hawthorne, Calif., is a vision in millennial aesthetics: all-white sneakers, long-sleeve T-shirts and Arial font.

And he's blowing up the internet.