WBGO Blog
  • Great Live Moments - Max Roach

    April 24, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Max Roach

    Max Roach christened WBGO's music studio. Thanks to our den mother, Dorthaan Kirk, Max came to our performance space in 1987 with two different ensembles. It was a Sunday afternoon, and Max wore a grey silk suit. Those performances with then-WBGO host James Browne marked the beginning of many ambitions for a fledgling jazz station. Now, we have music performances all the time (seven bands booked in this month alone). But the first session with Max Roach is one that many at WBGO will never forget.

    Listen to "Lonesome Lover," from the WBGO Archives.

    If you're feeling ambitious, check out the JazzSet Max Roach Memorial. It includes more music from this WBGO studio session.
    And it you're even more ambitious, and you love to pay nothing for a show (like most jazz people I know), head to Brooklyn for a three-day tribute to Max Roach.
    Fri 4/25 - Max Roach Tribute - music by Randy Weston African Rhythms & an ensemble featuring Lewis Nash, Concord Baptist Church of Christ, 833 Gardner C. Taylor Blvd, 718.756.9407,12-5PM
    Sat 4/26 - Max Roach Tribute - music by M' Boom, Jeff King Band & Cecil Bridgewater, Boys n Girls High School, 1700 Fulton St.,718.756.9407, 3-8PM
    Sun 4/27- Max Roach Tribute- panel discussion moderated by Gil Noble, interview with T.S. Monk, jazz celebrity jam session, Medgar Evers College, 1650 Bedford Ave, 718.756.9407, 3-7PM
    -Josh

  • Great Live Moments - Michael White and The Original Liberty Jazz Band

    April 23, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Paul Barbarin

    Meet Paul Barbarin, one of the most important people in the history of New Orleans music, and the "how" we call jazz.
    The Barbarin family constitutes one of the original lines of Creole musicians who were present at the creation of a new music. Paul's father, Isidore, played the alto horn in The Onward Brass Band, one of the early traditional brass bands in the city.

    Before I moved to New York, I used to work at WWOZ in New Orleans. I started as a volunteer, operating the board for a woman named Betty Rankin. Every Saturday morning, while most people my age had hangovers from Friday night, I was in a tiny peach-colored building in Louis Armstrong Park, playing LPs, cassettes, and the occasional CD for a lady who wanted no business with those details. She spent her ninety minutes as "Big Mama," the host of "The Moldy Fig Jam." I was 22, and this was the most amazing radio I had ever heard in my life. She told stories about every jazz musician in the city who had ever picked up an instrument with the purpose of playing traditional New Orleans jazz.

    As it happened, Big Mama was an associate curator of the Hogan Jazz Archive. She handled the extensive oral history of New Orleans' music, and she knew both the collection as well as the musicians' whose lives she had helped to document. On any given Saturday, she talked about Paul Barbarin as if he were in the studio with us. It was the beginning of my post-college, real world education. On one such occasion, it was the first time I had ever heard his song, "Bourbon Street Parade." She told her audience about the street parades, how Barbarin kept that tradition alive. In the 1960s, he revived the Onward Brass Band, the name of the group that his father played a part. In fact, Paul Barbarin died in a parade, leading the band. [While I'm no fan of death, that's a great way to shuffle off this mortal coil.]

    Years later, on the cusp of 2002, I was the field producer for NPR's Toast of the Nation. We're at the Village Vanguard, with Michael White and The Original Liberty Jazz Band. Hear them play "Bourbon Street Parade" from that evening.
    When I hear this song, I remember how I got this far into jazz. Because I live with music.
    -Josh

    PS Watch the video of Paul Barbarin's funeral. The musicians are playing "Just a Closer Walk With Thee."

     

    Watching that is knowing why New Orleans matters. Onward.

  • Great Live Moments - Benny Golson

    April 22, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Benny Golson

    Aside from being one of the foremost composers of jazz standards  - "I Remember Clifford," "Whisper Not," "Stablemates," and "Killer Joe" immediately come to mind - Benny Golson is one of the real gentlemen of our music.  When WBGO approached Mr. Golson for approval to post music from the American Jazz Radio Festival in 1987, here's what he said:

    Please use whatever you want in whatever way you choose. WBGO has made a
    hero out of me by playing my recordings over the years. Be assured, this
    does not go without much appreciation. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!
    May all that your collective hands find to do continue to meet with certain
    success always.
    Benny Golson

    Is this cat for real?  Yes, absolutely.

    Listen to Benny Golson's "Are You Real," from the WBGO Archives.

    Perhaps you'll consider becoming a WBGO member.  They make great live moments like this possible.  Contribute now.
    -Josh