WBGO Blog
  • How Bessie Smith Ushered In The Jazz Age

    April 28, 2015

    Jazz and blues are often treated as one and the same — but how did one end up taking over and surpassing the other, ushering in the jazz age?

    That's a subject of an upcoming HBO biopic, called Bessie, about singer and songwriter Bessie Smith and her mentor Ma Rainey. Jazz bassist and composer Christian McBride, host of NPR's Jazz Night In America and a regular guest on All Things Considered, spoke with host Audie Cornish about Bessie Smith's legacy.

    An edited transcript of their conversation follows.

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  • WBGO JAM Live 2015: New School Jazz Ensemble

    April 27, 2015. Posted by Tim Wilkins.

    The New School Jazz Ensemble performs live at WBGO for Jazz Appreciation Month, with vocalist Brianna Thomas. Click below to hear this concert, and tune in to 88.3 FM to hear this group featured on air during the last week of April. A full set list is below.

    Every week in April, WBGO-FM has showcased a different student ensemble with vocalists who performed live in our studios for Jazz Appreciation Month. All of these full sets are available online. Enjoy!

    Click on the image below to see a slideshow from this live in-studio performance.

    newschool669

    March 25th, 2015
    New School Jazz Ensemble - Live at WBGO

    1) ‘Round Midnight (Thelonius Monk)

    2) All Of Me (written by Gerald Marks and Seymour Simons)

    3) Smile (music by Charlie Chaplin, lyrics by  John Turner and Geoffrey Parsons)

    4) Bye Bye Blackbird (music by Ray Henderson lyrics by Mort Dixon)

    All traditional arrangements.

    Brianna Thomas, Vocals and Band Leader
    Jochem Le Cointre, Piano
    Alexander Claffy, Bass
    Cory Cox, Drums

  • First Listen: Kamasi Washington, 'The Epic'

    April 26, 2015

    image
    Kamashi Washington's new album, The Epic, comes out May 5. (Image Credit: Mike Park/Courtesy of the artist)

    The word "epic" sits cheerily amid the most overused hyperbole of our age. Teenage bros proclaim their recent "pretty epic" mild successes; sports commentators call anything which ends dramatically an "epic game"; the Internet-literate are quick to point out an "epic FAIL." But what else do you call a three-CD, nearly three-hour album anchored by a 10-piece jazz band, featuring a 32-piece orchestra and 20-member choir, and driven by the daydream of an imaginary martial arts grandmaster?

    The Epic is the title of the new recording from 34-year-old saxophonist and composer Kamasi Washington, a musician you may have heard but not heard of. That's his horn all over the newest releases by fellow Southern Californians Kendrick Lamar and Flying Lotus. (The Epic is being issued by Brainfeeder, the record label Lotus co-founded.) Washington has toured with Snoop Dogg, Raphael Saadiq and Chaka Khan; his jazz credentials include work with elders like Gerald Wilson, Stanley Clarke and Kenny Burrell. The singing electric bassist Thundercat (Stephen Bruner) and his brother, drummer Ronald Bruner Jr., are lifelong friends; in fact, Washington has known most of his bandmates since high school in in South Central Los Angeles.

    The confluence of those experiences — of participating in a huge and diverse LA jazz scene, of making music people actually dance to, of working with like-minded peers for years — emerges here as scope and grandeur. The Epic swims in rhythmic crosscurrents, with two bassists, two keyboard players, two drummers. It's made tall and wide by the presence of strings and voices, made forceful and direct by horn solos and singer Patrice Quinn. It seems intentionally to overwhelm, in an immersive way; it's music to be swept up by and revisited after the wave subsides.

    In working with so many future-forward musicians, you might expect Washington's music to be equally slippery and resistant to categorization. Surely it is to some extent, as his band pulls from a huge bag of tricks. It also likes a driving modal swing groove or a knotty post-bop horn melody; it plays the blues and the standard "Cherokee." They execute these ideas with such bigness, and such a wide color palette, and a mission to remake the word "jazz" in the image of their own generation. That's the feat here. You wouldn't be wrong to call that ambition epic.

    Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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