WBGO Blog
  • Vijay Iyer Trio At Metropolitan Museum Of Art

    May 6, 2015

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    Vijay Iyer Trio plays the Temple of Dendur. (Image Credit: NPR)

    The pianist and composer Vijay Iyer frames his new trio recording, Break Stuff, around the idea of musical breaks: "a break in music is still music: a span of time in which to act," he writes. Formally, he's referring to breakbeats and other musical breakdowns, but more generally, Iyer's trio exploits opportunities to rupture convention. The configuration featuring Stephan Crump on bass and Marcus Gilmore on drums, together now for over 11 years, has made an art of collective rhythmic risk-taking, whether on Iyer's compositions or while nodding to disruptive musical heroes like Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane and Detroit techno DJ Robert Hood.

    Jazz Night In America visits the Temple of Dendur, the Egyptian temple which resides within a massive room in New York City's Metropolitan Museum of Art, to take in a set from the Vijay Iyer Trio.

    Copyright 2015 WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center. To see more, visit .

  • Roseanna Vitro & Mark Soskin Live At WBGO: Listen Now

    May 4, 2015. Posted by Tim Wilkins.

    Singer Roseanna Vitro and pianist Mark Soskin perform live at WBGO and are interviewed by Michael Bourne to celebrate International Jazz Day on April 30, 2015. Enjoy!

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  • A New Jazz Suite For Head, Shoulders, Knees And Toes

    May 3, 2015

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    Steve Coleman's new album is called Synovial Joints. (Image Credit: Jeff Fusco/ John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

    Is there a modern-day equivalent to Duke Ellington? Or Ornette Coleman?

    Who are the people today who think differently about jazz — who have created new forms, and expanded the musical vocabulary?

    For 30 years, saxophonist Steve Coleman has been pushing the music forward, traveling the world to collect new sounds, rhythms and ideas. Along the way he's mentored many of the most exciting younger artists in jazz — musicians like Ambrose Akinmusire, Jason Moran and Vijay Iyer.

    Steve Coleman's new album features a compelling four-part suite for large ensemble. Each movement is named after parts of the body. The suite, and the album, are called Synovial Joints — after the flexible, often complex joints found in places like shoulders, elbows, knees, hips, fingers and wrists.

    "I found the most inspiration over my life in nature," Coleman says. "It just kind of hit me in an inspirational way because I saw a lot of musical motion in the way melodies connect and in the way rhythms connect. What I was imagining when I was doing improvisation was what kind of motion the different joints allow, in terms of they connect."

    In an interview with NPR's Arun Rath, heard at the above audio link, Coleman talks about the three different groups of musicians that came together for this project, his "camouflage orchestration" and a recent conversation with Sonny Rollins.

    "We were talking about being in this kind of meditative state, almost like yoga or something like this, where we play from," Coleman says. "You want to get to the point where you actually don't feel like you're thinking or doing anything — that energy is just working through you. That's the ideal point you want to get to — we don't always get there. What I did with this record was that I played, 20-25 improvisations, and I picked the ones that did the best job of getting to that place. And you can hear it afterward — you know when you've hit it."

    Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.