WBGO Blog
  • Michael Bourne's Favorite Interviews

    March 1, 2014. Posted by Brandy Wood.

    What are Michael Bourne's favorite interviews from his three decades at WBGO? We asked the host of Afternoon Jazz, Blues Hour and Singers Unlimited to share these with us, as we prepare to celebrate our 35th anniversary. Enjoy!

    I've interviewed countless musicians and others through my going-on-30 years as a jock on WBGO.  Maybe a thousand?  Maybe two thousand -- if you count the 25-a-day I've sometimes talked with at conferences or festivals we've broadcast from.  I've loved especially broadcasting from my favorite festival, Festival International de Jazz de Montreal.

    This year being FIJM's 35th and WBGO's 35th, you can expect a more exciting broadcast than ever as the world's best jazz festival (sez me) and the world's best jazz radio station (sez everybody) celebrates together.

    Who've been my favorite interviews for WBGO?  So many of my favorite artists:

    Bourne Bennett

    Tony Bennett at WBGO, parts 1 and 2

    Tony in Montreal

    Dave Brubeck, at his home in Connecticut

    Paquito D'Rivera

    Cleo Laine & John Dankworth

    Claire Martin

    Diana Krall

    Ian Shaw

    Manhattan Transfer

    Barbara Carroll

    Robert Klein

    And from the Blues Hour:

    Marcia Ball

    Derek Trucks & Susan Tedeschi

    Other greats come to mind from before our era of on-demand everything - Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Williams, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Gatemouth Brown, Little Milton...

    Several generations of jazz artists have come along in the years since WBGO came on the air.

    We're still (and always will be) playing Ella and Sarah, Dizzy and Miles, but in this last 35 years along came some new one-name-only singers and players: Kurt and Cassandra, Wynton and Branford -- and they're now an older generation.

    Our annual JAM-fest (Jazz Appreciation Month Festival) in April is a spotlight on the newest generation, some of the best and brightest newcomers from schools in NJ, NY, and down from Boston.

    When you hear them playing live on WBGO, you're hearing the future of jazz… and of the station.

  • Happy Birthday Tony! Bourne's Ageless Bennett Songs

    August 5, 2013. Posted by Michael Bourne.

    Saturday August 3rd was the birthday of Tony Bennett. 87 and ageless. He's always been one of my favorite singers, one of everyone's favorite singers.

    Here are my favorite songs that he's recorded, or I've heard him sing, through the years: I'll celebrate Tony's birthday belatedly and spotlight these songs on my next edition of Singers Unlimited on Sunday, August 11 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Happy birthday, Tony!

    Bennett.2090.C2.17.DH
    Tony in the recording studio, 1960: photo by Don Hunstein

    "Being Alive" on The Art of Romance

    Great song from the Sondheim musical Company. Phil Woods solos, Tony's great friend Candido plays congas, and it feels so good that his singing is nonetheless so "alive"-ly.

    "But Beautiful" from his album with Bill Evans

    Tony told me that Bill played variation after variation of the songs they were about to record, listening for the right feeling for the songs. Tony asked the engineer if he'd been recording Bill playing, and the engineer said no. Tony said it was some of the most beautiful music he's ever heard, said that Bill's variations alone would've been one of the greatest albums (n)ever recorded.

    "If I Could Go Back" from Tell Her It's Snowing on MGM

    Bacharach and David song from the infamous flop movie musical of "Lost Horizon," meant to be sung by Peter Finch as he wonders whether to return to Shangri-la -- only, Peter Finch couldn't sing and the song was cut from the soundtrack. Tony's recording is downright operatic and powerful, one of his most dramatic vocals.

    Twist is: the song is not among the thousand or so songs of Tony's "Complete Collection" omni-box of CDs, and I don't know why not.

    "Reflections" from Life Is Beautiful on Tony's own label Improv

    Duke Ellington song. I'd heard it played as an instrumental, "Reflections in D" by Duke, but I'd never heard the lyric. When John Dankworth and Cleo Laine told me they were recording an Ellington album, I said it was a song that Cleo, more than anyone other than Tony, could sing wonderfully. I sent Tony's recording to them, she sings it (wonderfully indeed) on Cleo's album "Solitude."

    "Speak Low" by Kurt Weill

    Weill is a composer that he's always felt an affinity for. Tony recorded a long medley of Weill songs at his famous Carnegie concert.

    I'll never forget another Carnegie performance when Tony came to the great Ogden Nash lyric "Time is so long and love so brief. Love is pure gold and time a THIEF!" Tony shouted the word "thief" with so much ... anger, really. I was awestruck.

    I've heard him sing it many times, on record and in concerts. It's the only song I've ever requested from him, and he sang it for me at the jazzfest in Umbria. It's always a highlight for me at every concert -- but I've never again heard him shout the word "thief" like that concert at Carnegie.

    "Stranger In Paradise"

    Tony recorded the hit song from one of my favorite musicals, Kismet, before the show opened on Broadway, and the show opened with a hit already on the radio.

    "Maybe September"

    Tony's own favorite of the more or less 100 albums he's recorded is The Movie Song Album, and he especially likes "The Shadow of Your Smile" as arranged by the composer, Johnny Mandel.

    I like this one, which is the theme song from the only movie he's acted in, "The Oscar" -- not a good movie, but Tony is intense.

    "Here's That Rainy Day"

    Song by composer Jimmy Van Heusen and lyricist Johnny Burke on Tony's Perfectly Frank album, his tribute to his friend and idol Frank Sinatra. Tony sings an exquisite wordless vocal prelude to what I've often said is the greatest of all standards.

    "Alright, Okay, You Win" on Playing with My Friends

    "The Best Is Yet To Come" on Duets: An American Classic

    Both songs are duets with Diana Krall. Really, my favorite is neither of these.

    When Diana was becoming a star at the Montreal Jazz Festival, she played a lovely concert in the Maisonneuve hall, second-biggest of Place des Arts. Tony was singing right after at the Wilfrid-Pelletier hall, first-biggest.

    In the middle of his concert, Tony called out Diana, said how much he enjoyed her singing, sat her down at the piano, stood by the piano with a mic in his hand, and said "Sing something."

    I remember the moment more than what song -- pretty sure it was "They Can't Take That Away From Me." What was truly memorable was the feeling of Diana being anointed as a singer of standards by one of the greatest singers of standards.

    "How Do You Keep The Music Playing?"

    Before another concert at the jazzfest in Montreal, Tony was honored with the festival's Ella Fitzgerald Award. He was obviously that much happier than he always is when singing in Montreal.

    I expected only to hear maybe the first 20 minutes and then go to another gig, but Tony sounded better than I'd ever heard him, and I stayed. I've heard him for years climaxing a concert with "How Do You Keep The Music Playing?"

    This night, he was singing so full-throttle that for the first time I heard a little tiredness in his voice. Would he have chops enough or even breath enough for the high notes at the dramatic finale of the song -- when he sings that "the music NEVER, NEVER ends!" I was literally at the edge of my seat, and he nailed it!