WBGO Blog
  • Sound Prints Quintet: Live At The Village Vanguard

    November 28, 2012. Posted by WBGO.

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    The Sound Prints Quintet is (L-R): Lawrence Fields, Dave Douglas, Joe Lovano, Linda Oh, Joey Baron. (Image Credit: John Rogers for NPR/johnrogersnyc.com)

    Few jazz bandleaders are as active — and as actively acclaimed — as saxophonist Joe Lovano and trumpeter Dave Douglas. But while they've met from time to time on the bandstand, their brief overlap in the SFJAZZ collective — during a season when the compositions of Wayne Shorter were featured — got them to lead a band together. It's a quintet in which they share compositional duties and top billing. And it's a band featuring two up-and-coming musicians in pianist Lawrence Fields and bassist Linda Oh, as well as Joey Baron, a drummer with whom they've grown up in music.

    The Sound Prints Quintet has toured this year, and will play some U.S. dates when it swings into New York's Village Vanguard for a week. (Both Douglas and Lovano are well acquainted with the place.) WBGO and NPR Music featured this live concert by the band, broadcast on air and as a video webcast, on Wednesday, Nov. 28.

    Set List

    • "Sound Prints" (Lovano)
    • "Sprints" (Douglas)
    • "Dream State" (Douglas)
    • "Weather Man" (Lovano)
    • "Ups And Downs" (Douglas)
    • "Power Ranger" (Douglas)

    Personnel

    • Joe Lovano, saxophones
    • Dave Douglas, trumpet
    • Lawrence Fields, piano
    • Linda Oh, bass
    • Joey Baron, drums

    Credits

    Host and Producer: Josh Jackson; Audio Engineer: David Tallacksen; Production Assistant: Michael Downes. Recorded Nov. 28, 2012 at The Village Vanguard in New York, N.Y.

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  • 'Treme' Ep. 31: To Call It Quits

    November 27, 2012. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

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    The Lambreaux family meets with New Orleans city planners concerning a national jazz center. (Image Credit: Paul Schiraldi/HBO)

    At the end of Treme's season three, with only an abbreviated season four to come, we find many characters walking away from opportunities. Spoiler alert for what follows.

    Lt. Colson leaves his job with an emphatic physical statement. The Lambreaux family walks away from the national jazz center project in Congo Square. Janette tries to leave her own restaurant. Antoine seems to be accepting that his calling is more in teaching than performing. Davis calls it quits on his music career. Annie is on the verge of quitting on Davis. Everett leaves town, his story done but with lasting change unresolved. Even LaDonna, among the most willfully determined characters in the show, isn't prepared to file a civil suit to follow up on the mistrial of her rapist.

    To help recap the soundtrack of the action, here once again is WBGO's Josh Jackson.

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  • 'Treme,' Ep. 30: Doing One Thing Right

    November 19, 2012. Posted by WBGO.

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    Antoine Batiste (Wendell Pierce) and his student Robert (Jaron Williams) take a minute with trumpeter Lionel Ferbos, playing himself, at the Palm Court Jazz Cafe. (Image Credit: Paul Schiraldi/HBO)

    Nearly three seasons in, the character Davis still puzzles many of us who watch the show Treme.

    He certainly cares. Whether leading historical tours or launching R&B operas for royalty-abuse awareness, or throwing himself into various protests, he has a winning drive to do right by his hometown. Davis lives to participate in the New Orleans music community, and the earnest charm of his homerism isn't lost on other characters around him.

    At the same time, he's a whiny brat. He's uncomfortable with the privilege of his upbringing, yet moans when its largesse can't rescue his schemes or buy him acceptance. He aspires to work with the top tier of musicians in town, but clearly isn't on their level, and doesn't put in the effort to fix that. And as a boyfriend, he's so self-absorbed as to take Annie's presence for granted, even meddling drunkenly in her successes — not to mention cheating on her. It is implied, though never stated, that he's a tiny bit jealous of Annie's success.

    We heard his intrusion as Annie's Bayou Cadillac band tracked "This City" in the studio. Then we hear him working out an angry new song called "I Quit" at his piano. For the rest of this episode in music, here's Josh Jackson of WBGO.

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