WBGO Blog
  • Dr. King 40 Years Later

    April 4, 2008. Posted by Angelika Beener.

    mlk_jr_slaying.jpg

    Sigh...

    Today marks 40 years since one of the greatest civil rights leaders and humanitarians was gunned down and taken away from us.
    Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot on the balcony of his hotel room in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a march of sanitation workers protesting against low wages and poor working conditions.

    I wasn't even born when Dr. King was assassinated, but I can only imagine the heartbreak that people felt upon first getting that worst piece of news.
    It breaks my heart to think about it as I write this post. Time flies, and many people I talk to can hardly believe its been 40 years.

    For me, it's important to really think about and help others to realize that King was not a man who was a dreamer as the media loves to portray. Yes, he was a man of unparalleled vision, and hope. But he was also a leader through action, and the hardest of hard workers. I would ask that on this day, you would read or listen to Dr. King speak about opposition to war, or why it is important to vote, for example. Not only was he ahead of his time but he is timeless. Take the time to really dig into King - the man, not just the dream.

  • Over Drive

    February 17, 2008

    Rob Crocker played John Coltrane's "My Favorite Things" as the winter fund drive faded into memory at 6 p.m. Sunday. Goals were met, audience sustained, and nobody got hurt too badly.

    These fund drives are a major undertaking and consume the entire staff, so when its over, there is a collective "Whew!" around here. Listen to how quiet we sound for the next few days. Jock exhaustion.

    Since this drive began, we've gone through the Super Bowl, Super Tuesday, the Super Bowl parade, the NHL and NBA All Star games and said Bye Ya to "Smooth Jazz" radio. We heard from you in Sudan, Iraq, Japan, UK, Ireland, Kuala Lampur, Bayamon, Sao Paolo and even exotic Lubbock, Texas.

    Thanks to all of you who made a pledge this time around. You do nothing less than keep jazz alive on the radio. - David Cruz

  • When music, life and mother nature collide

    January 17, 2008. Posted by David Tallacksen.

    The Katrina Project

    The Katrina Project tells the story of the infamous hurricane and its affect on the arts and cultural life in New Orleans. Tonight's standing-room-only gallery reception featured a discussion with photographers Douglas L. Adams, Jr. and Norman DeShong. Moderator David Cruz was also joined by panelists Tanisha McHarris, Roland Angland, and Yanada Essex.

    The conversation was frank and honest - the kind we should hear more of, since the Crescent City's troubles continue. I encourage you to take a listen.

    Katrina Project Gallery Discussion

    The hauntingly beautiful gallery continues for just a short time more, so check it out - you can find out more here.