WBGO Blog
  • Great Live Moments - Michael White and The Original Liberty Jazz Band

    April 23, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Paul Barbarin

    Meet Paul Barbarin, one of the most important people in the history of New Orleans music, and the "how" we call jazz.
    The Barbarin family constitutes one of the original lines of Creole musicians who were present at the creation of a new music. Paul's father, Isidore, played the alto horn in The Onward Brass Band, one of the early traditional brass bands in the city.

    Before I moved to New York, I used to work at WWOZ in New Orleans. I started as a volunteer, operating the board for a woman named Betty Rankin. Every Saturday morning, while most people my age had hangovers from Friday night, I was in a tiny peach-colored building in Louis Armstrong Park, playing LPs, cassettes, and the occasional CD for a lady who wanted no business with those details. She spent her ninety minutes as "Big Mama," the host of "The Moldy Fig Jam." I was 22, and this was the most amazing radio I had ever heard in my life. She told stories about every jazz musician in the city who had ever picked up an instrument with the purpose of playing traditional New Orleans jazz.

    As it happened, Big Mama was an associate curator of the Hogan Jazz Archive. She handled the extensive oral history of New Orleans' music, and she knew both the collection as well as the musicians' whose lives she had helped to document. On any given Saturday, she talked about Paul Barbarin as if he were in the studio with us. It was the beginning of my post-college, real world education. On one such occasion, it was the first time I had ever heard his song, "Bourbon Street Parade." She told her audience about the street parades, how Barbarin kept that tradition alive. In the 1960s, he revived the Onward Brass Band, the name of the group that his father played a part. In fact, Paul Barbarin died in a parade, leading the band. [While I'm no fan of death, that's a great way to shuffle off this mortal coil.]

    Years later, on the cusp of 2002, I was the field producer for NPR's Toast of the Nation. We're at the Village Vanguard, with Michael White and The Original Liberty Jazz Band. Hear them play "Bourbon Street Parade" from that evening.
    When I hear this song, I remember how I got this far into jazz. Because I live with music.
    -Josh

    PS Watch the video of Paul Barbarin's funeral. The musicians are playing "Just a Closer Walk With Thee."

     

    Watching that is knowing why New Orleans matters. Onward.

  • Great Live Moments - Benny Golson

    April 22, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Benny Golson

    Aside from being one of the foremost composers of jazz standards  - "I Remember Clifford," "Whisper Not," "Stablemates," and "Killer Joe" immediately come to mind - Benny Golson is one of the real gentlemen of our music.  When WBGO approached Mr. Golson for approval to post music from the American Jazz Radio Festival in 1987, here's what he said:

    Please use whatever you want in whatever way you choose. WBGO has made a
    hero out of me by playing my recordings over the years. Be assured, this
    does not go without much appreciation. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!
    May all that your collective hands find to do continue to meet with certain
    success always.
    Benny Golson

    Is this cat for real?  Yes, absolutely.

    Listen to Benny Golson's "Are You Real," from the WBGO Archives.

    Perhaps you'll consider becoming a WBGO member.  They make great live moments like this possible.  Contribute now.
    -Josh

  • Great Live Moments - John Hicks and Albert Dailey

    April 21, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Billy Strayhorn

    A Billy Strayhorn melody is so very nice to hear on solo piano. A Billy Strayhorn medley is even better when there are two pianos. In 1983, at the Jazz Forum in New York, the lyrical master John Hicks and the underrated Albert Dailey put Strayhorn's music on display for more than twenty-three minutes. 'Star-Crossed Lovers' (aka "Pretty Girl") and 'Chelsea Bridge' were songs that I always believed Strayhorn had tailor-made for their respective soloists, Johnny Hodges and Ben Webster. However, these are such tremendous songs, all they require are the hands of any master musician. On this particular evening in September, they received four master hands, and 176 piano keys.
    -Josh
    Listen to the Billy Strayhorn medley, from the WBGO Archives.

  • Great Live Moments - Dee Dee Bridgewater

    April 18, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Dee Dee Bridgewater

    It has been amazing to know Dee Dee Bridgewater, and an honor to hear her read my name occasionally in the credits for JazzSet. And what an artistic career! Her latest recording, "Red Earth," a collaboration with Malian musicians, is just another reminder of how truly hip she is.
    Long before she was the host of NPR's JazzSet (a program lovingly produced here at WBGO), Dee Dee Bridgewater was a part of our annual New Year's Eve coast-to-coast celebration, Toast of the Nation. From the ballroom at the Grand Hyatt in New York, Bridgewater greeted 1996 on the East Coast with music from her then recent recording, Love and Peace: A Tribute to Horace Silver.

    Listen to Dee Dee Bridgewater sing "Song for My Father," from the WBGO Archives.
    -Josh

  • Lionel Loueke - Live @ J&R Music World

    April 17, 2008. Posted by Angelika Beener.

    dsc_0164.JPG

    Last weekend, Spring (no, more like Summer) peaked at New York City. It was a perfect Saturday afternoon for being out and about. It was especially highlighted by seeing one of my new favorite musicians live in concert. Lionel Loueke is a spectacular artist, and musician. I first heard of the guitarist/vocalist in 2002 when he was recording for Terence Blanchard on the latter's Blue Note debut, Bounce. I had never really heard anything like it. I had obviously heard many African musicians and varying styles of African music. But never in the context that this cat was introducing. Randy Weston pioneered the movement of taking Jazz to Africa in the 60s, and making a purposeful commitment to making the connections blatantly clear in astonishingly beautiful ways. 40 years later, Loueke has boomeranged it back to the States straight from Benin, Africa...and it is KILLIN'.

    Loueke previously released a trio of albums on indie labels. You should check them all out - my particular fav is Virgin Forest. I won't say that all have "led up to" per se, but Loueke has certainly been put on the map in a major way with his latest CD for the Blue Note label. It's called Karibu, which means "Welcome" in Swahili. It features Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter (no...seriously) and Lionel's long-time killer trio of Massimo Biolcati and Ferenc Nemeth. It should be noted that Lionel has been working hard building a name for himself long before being signed to the reputable Blue Note Records. He had been in Terence Blanchard's band for 5+ years, and has been touring and recording with Mr. Hancock for about 3 years give or take. Needless to say, he's got the hot hand, and anyone with (or without for that matter) any jazz sensibilities knows that he's definitely one to watch.

    We had the honor of hosting and broadcasting Lionel's "CD release" at J&R Music World last week. If you made it out, you know that it was really something. Lionel played tunes from the new CD, and for a special treat, a sweet version of "Body & Soul" in 7/4. He opened the set with the title track, which has a completely infectious Afro-groove. Throughout the set he brought that thing that I have felt is sometimes missing from the scene - fire! Loueke is definitely part of the vibrant jazz movement that is not afraid, conforming, or overly nostalgic.
    He's one of those unpredictable and inspiring artists that just has you coming back again and again...that's how it should be.

    And by the way, if you missed it...not to worry. Check it out here.

    Let us know what you think!