WBGO Blog
  • Great Live Moments - Benny Golson

    April 22, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Benny Golson

    Aside from being one of the foremost composers of jazz standards  - "I Remember Clifford," "Whisper Not," "Stablemates," and "Killer Joe" immediately come to mind - Benny Golson is one of the real gentlemen of our music.  When WBGO approached Mr. Golson for approval to post music from the American Jazz Radio Festival in 1987, here's what he said:

    Please use whatever you want in whatever way you choose. WBGO has made a
    hero out of me by playing my recordings over the years. Be assured, this
    does not go without much appreciation. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!
    May all that your collective hands find to do continue to meet with certain
    success always.
    Benny Golson

    Is this cat for real?  Yes, absolutely.

    Listen to Benny Golson's "Are You Real," from the WBGO Archives.

    Perhaps you'll consider becoming a WBGO member.  They make great live moments like this possible.  Contribute now.
    -Josh

  • Great Live Moments - John Hicks and Albert Dailey

    April 21, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Billy Strayhorn

    A Billy Strayhorn melody is so very nice to hear on solo piano. A Billy Strayhorn medley is even better when there are two pianos. In 1983, at the Jazz Forum in New York, the lyrical master John Hicks and the underrated Albert Dailey put Strayhorn's music on display for more than twenty-three minutes. 'Star-Crossed Lovers' (aka "Pretty Girl") and 'Chelsea Bridge' were songs that I always believed Strayhorn had tailor-made for their respective soloists, Johnny Hodges and Ben Webster. However, these are such tremendous songs, all they require are the hands of any master musician. On this particular evening in September, they received four master hands, and 176 piano keys.
    -Josh
    Listen to the Billy Strayhorn medley, from the WBGO Archives.

  • Great Live Moments - Dee Dee Bridgewater

    April 18, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Dee Dee Bridgewater

    It has been amazing to know Dee Dee Bridgewater, and an honor to hear her read my name occasionally in the credits for JazzSet. And what an artistic career! Her latest recording, "Red Earth," a collaboration with Malian musicians, is just another reminder of how truly hip she is.
    Long before she was the host of NPR's JazzSet (a program lovingly produced here at WBGO), Dee Dee Bridgewater was a part of our annual New Year's Eve coast-to-coast celebration, Toast of the Nation. From the ballroom at the Grand Hyatt in New York, Bridgewater greeted 1996 on the East Coast with music from her then recent recording, Love and Peace: A Tribute to Horace Silver.

    Listen to Dee Dee Bridgewater sing "Song for My Father," from the WBGO Archives.
    -Josh

  • Lionel Loueke - Live @ J&R Music World

    April 17, 2008. Posted by Angelika Beener.

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    Last weekend, Spring (no, more like Summer) peaked at New York City. It was a perfect Saturday afternoon for being out and about. It was especially highlighted by seeing one of my new favorite musicians live in concert. Lionel Loueke is a spectacular artist, and musician. I first heard of the guitarist/vocalist in 2002 when he was recording for Terence Blanchard on the latter's Blue Note debut, Bounce. I had never really heard anything like it. I had obviously heard many African musicians and varying styles of African music. But never in the context that this cat was introducing. Randy Weston pioneered the movement of taking Jazz to Africa in the 60s, and making a purposeful commitment to making the connections blatantly clear in astonishingly beautiful ways. 40 years later, Loueke has boomeranged it back to the States straight from Benin, Africa...and it is KILLIN'.

    Loueke previously released a trio of albums on indie labels. You should check them all out - my particular fav is Virgin Forest. I won't say that all have "led up to" per se, but Loueke has certainly been put on the map in a major way with his latest CD for the Blue Note label. It's called Karibu, which means "Welcome" in Swahili. It features Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter (no...seriously) and Lionel's long-time killer trio of Massimo Biolcati and Ferenc Nemeth. It should be noted that Lionel has been working hard building a name for himself long before being signed to the reputable Blue Note Records. He had been in Terence Blanchard's band for 5+ years, and has been touring and recording with Mr. Hancock for about 3 years give or take. Needless to say, he's got the hot hand, and anyone with (or without for that matter) any jazz sensibilities knows that he's definitely one to watch.

    We had the honor of hosting and broadcasting Lionel's "CD release" at J&R Music World last week. If you made it out, you know that it was really something. Lionel played tunes from the new CD, and for a special treat, a sweet version of "Body & Soul" in 7/4. He opened the set with the title track, which has a completely infectious Afro-groove. Throughout the set he brought that thing that I have felt is sometimes missing from the scene - fire! Loueke is definitely part of the vibrant jazz movement that is not afraid, conforming, or overly nostalgic.
    He's one of those unpredictable and inspiring artists that just has you coming back again and again...that's how it should be.

    And by the way, if you missed it...not to worry. Check it out here.

    Let us know what you think!

  • Great Live Moments - Fred Hersch

    April 17, 2008. Posted by Becca Pulliam.

    Fred Hersch

    Fred Hersch has been a friend of WBGO for at least twenty years. He was in Jane Ira Bloom's group when we recorded her at Citicorp Center for a series called Jazz at the Market (host was the Rev. John Garcia Gensel of St. Peter's Church). I remember that Fred and Jane had brought a piano tuner, but the Center didn't want their tuner to touch the piano. I was disappointed, and learning on the job. Fred was .. well, if not incensed, he was at least insulted.

    Fred was part of a concert at Town Hall with MC Steve Allen (the TV personality, dating all the way back to the first Tonight Show). As Steve Allen was telling stories and getting into it, he turned to Fred and asked for "a little something underneath this;" on demand, Fred played the perfect "patter" music.

    But Fred wasn't born for that role. From his earliest time in New York, he belonged in top groups. He was a sideman for leaders a generation or more his senior, such as Joe Henderson - from Ohio, like Fred.

    At the Iowa City Jazz Festival in the 1990s, I remember Fred getting onstage and talking about funding cuts coming to the National Endowment for the Arts. He wanted me to do that with him, and I didn't. His political passion took me by surprise.

    Fred studied with Sophia Rosoff (as did Barry Harris, a revered teacher in New York, who shows pianists how to produce sound through the keys by relaxing. Ethan Iverson of The Bad Plus was one of Fred's many many students.

    The 1986 group must have been one of his first. Dick Oatts was on sax, Randy Brecker on trumpet, although they stepped aside for the ballad "Con Alma."
    -Becca Pulliam

    Listen to the Fred Hersch Trio play "Con Alma," from the WBGO Archives.