WBGO Blog
  • One love!

    February 6, 2008

    Robert Nesta Marley was born on this day (Feb 6) in 1945 in Jamaica, W.I. His friends called him Bob. He died in 1981. Simple math will tell you that he barely got a chance to live. But the music he crammed into his 36 years will outlive all of us.

    If all you know about Bob Marley is "I shot the Sheriff," I urge you to dig deeper. The man was one of the most eloquent and sensitive songwriters ever. Whether he was singing about the oppression of hate or the deliverance of love, his lyrics were simply - true. Marley is Dylan is Lennon and McCartney is Jagger and Richards and then some. But, as hip as those cats were, they still couldn't break it down like Bob.

    "I-and-I no come to fight flesh and blood, but spiritual wickedness in high and low places; so while they fight you down, stand firm and give Jah thanks and praises! I-and-I don't expect to be justified by the laws of men. Oh, You may find me guilty but truth, truth will prove my innocence. When the rain falls, it don't fall on one man's house. Just remember that!"

    You don't have to be a Rasta to dig that! Happy Birthday, Bob. This world misses you, bro. - David Cruz

  • Dispatches from the drive

    January 31, 2008

    On the second day ... we started to hit our stride. Believe it or not, these fund drives are as much science as art. Sure, you've got your witty and knowledgeable hosts and sidekicks (like me) but we actually plan ahead for the drive, coming up with themes and strategies, often based on what we hear from you.

    I won't tell you what's different about this drive; I'll let you figure that one out yourself. Today's highlights included pledges from South Carolina and Rhode Island. I'm always amazed that people hundreds of miles outside of our listening area actually take the time to make a pledge of support. How cool is that?

    Things you missed today, if you weren't listening include Michael Bourne's tale of smoking (not cigars!) with Dizzy Gillespie while watching soap operas; Gary Walker explaining what it means when the horse in a statue of a guy on a horse has one leg or two raised; and Rhonda Hamilton's really bad New England accent.

    Now we three sidekicks (Doug Doyle, Andrew Meyer and I) are preparing for "Lessons Learned," our one-hour call-in show with Newark School Superintendent Marion Bolden. This could be interesting - David Cruz

  • Eliane Elias at J&R - Something For You

    January 29, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Eliane Elias Photo

    Eliane Elias and her trio - bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Billy Hart - played the music of Bill Evans at J&R, and we broadcast it live.

    If you missed it, you can listen to some selections from the live concert here.
    -Josh

    PS Some great Bill Evans quotes collected here.