WBGO Blog
  • Songs of the Civil Rights Movement - Rhonda Hamilton

    January 14, 2016. Posted by Brandy Wood.

    Add new comment | Filed under: Jazz Alive

    WBGO continues its celebration of the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. leading up to this weekend's Jazz & Civil Rights panel discussion in Newark.

    Rhonda Hamilton
    Rhonda Hamilton

    Today, we share Midday Jazz host Rhonda Hamilton's favorite songs of the Civil Rights Movement. You can find a selection of all the songs available for download at WBGO's Amazon store, a portion of each purchase there supports this public radio station!

    BID ‘EM IN – OSCAR BROWN, JR. from SIN & SOUL

    WHEN PEOPLE MENTION THE “CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT” WE THINK OF THAT PERIOD IN THE LATE 1950’S AND 1960’S WHEN DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. WAS LEADING THE FIGHT AGAINST RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AND INEQUALITY IN THE UNITED STATES, BUT FOR AFRICAN-AMERICANS, THAT STRUGGLE BEGAN HUNDREDS OF YEARS EARLIER DURING THE DAYS OF SLAVERY. OSCAR BROWN, JR. TELLS US THE RAW TRUTH WITH BID ‘EM IN.

    A CHANGE IS GONNA COME – SAM COOKE from PORTRAIT OF A LEGEND 1951-1964
    IN THE SAM COOKE COLLECTION, PORTRAIT OF A LEGEND IT’S SAID THAT HIS SONG, A CHANGE IS GONNA COME CAME TO HIM “ALMOST AS IF IT WERE DICTATED IN A DREAM.” COOKE DONATED THIS RECORDING FOR AN ALBUM THAT BENEFITED DR. KING’S SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE.

    I HAVE A DREAM – HERBIE HANCOCK from THE PRISONER
    IN 1963, ONE HUNDRED YEARS AFTER ABRAHAM LINCOLN ISSUED THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION AND 98 YEARS AFTER THE 13TH AMENDMENT ABOLISHED SLAVERY, DR. KING GAVE HIS FAMOUS “I HAVE A DREAM” SPEECH IN WASHINGTON, D.C. HERBIE HANCOCK’S COMPOSITION OF THE SAME TITLE WAS RECORDED ONE YEAR AFTER DR. KING WAS ASSASINATED.

    I WISH I KNEW HOW IT WOULD FEEL TO BE FREE – BILLY TAYLOR from MUSIC KEEPS US YOUNG

    DR. BILLY TAYLOR TOLD ME THAT HE WROTE THE SONG, I WISH I KNEW HOW IT WOULD FEEL TO BE FREE AS A WAY TO DEMONSTRATE TO HIS DAUGHTER, KIM, HOW TO SING A SPIRITUAL OR A GOSPEL SONG WITH FEELING. IT BECAME HIS BEST KNOWN AND MOST RECORDED COMPOSITION AND ULTIMATELY, AN ANTHEM OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT.

    IF YOU REALLY ARE CONCERNED – BILLY TAYLOR from TAYLOR MADE AT THE KENNEDY CENTER
    COMMISONED BY THE ATLANTA SYMPHONY, DR. BILLY TAYLOR COMPOSED “PEACEFUL WARRIOR”, AN EXTENDED WORK DEDICATED TO DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DEE DEE BRIDGEWATER SINGS AN EXCERPT FROM THE SUITE, IF YOU REALLY ARE CONCERNED.

  • WBGO in the Media!

    January 12, 2016. Posted by Nicole Sweeney.

    We are happy and proud to see WBGO’s local and national profile grow stronger through key members of the WBGO staff being prominently featured in mainstream media.

    Music Director Gary Walker on 60 Minutes

    Gary Walker & Joey Alexander
    Gary Walker & pianist Joey Alexander

    Dorthaan Kirk prominently profiled in the NY Times

    Dorthaan Kirk
    Dorthaan Kirk

    On-Air Announcer Sheila Anderson on NBC

    Janice Huff & Sheila Anderson
    Janice Huff & Sheila Anderson

  • Ticket Giveaway - Dance Theatre of Harlem at NJPAC

    January 11, 2016. Posted by Brandy Wood.

    Add new comment | Filed under: Jazz Alive

    NJPAC’s annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration pays tribute to the life and legacy of one of the 20th century’s most inspiring leaders. January 2016 features the return of Dance Theatre of Harlem, the legendary ballet company founded as an artistic means to turn despair into hope following the assassination of Dr. King.

    The program’s guest speaker is the Rev. Dr. Jerry M. Sanders, senior pastor of the Fountain Baptist Church in Summit.

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  • Best in Jazz: 2015

    January 5, 2016. Posted by Steve Williams.

    Add new comment | Filed under: Jazz Alive

    Daytime-DJs-300x300

    Gary Walker, Rhonda Hamilton and Michael Bourne play excerpts from, and offer in depth commentary about their favorite jazz recording releases of 2015.

  • The NYC Winter JazzFest 2016

    January 2, 2016. Posted by Brandy Wood.

    WBGO is once again partnering with The NYC Winter JazzFest in 2016. In the current issue of WBGO's program guide, Upbeat, there was a partial interview with one of the festival's producers, Brice Rosenbloom. The full interview plus artist interviews and more follow.


    Manfred Eichner, founder and owner of ECM Records

    Vijay Iyer

    Pianist Vijay Iyer talks with Simon Rentner about his latest ECM album and inspirations from Billy Strayhorn and Detroit techno producer DJ Robert Hood.

    Gilad Hekselman
    Gilad Hekselman

    Guitarist Gilad Hekselman on The Checkout

    Dr. Lonnie Smith

    Dr. Lonnie Smith recorded live at WBGO

    ********************

    The Winter Jazz Festival, which turns 12 this year, runs in various venues around Greenwich Village in Manhattan, January 13-17. WBGO will once again partner with the festival, and Simon Rentner, host of The Checkout (Tuesdays at 6:30PM on 88.3FM WBGO and wbgo.org), sat down with the festival’s creator, Brice Rosenbloom, to discuss this year’s event.
    Simon: So how big can this festival really get?

    Brice: The audience that comes out every year …and the amount of talent that’s out there tell us that we can continue to see it grow every year. This year will be five days long [with more than] a hundred and twenty groups, over 650 musicians performing [in] 14 different venues across the Village. Last year we were in a beautiful venue, the Minetta Theatre, which we don’t have access to this year. [That] propelled us to start a conversation with the New School, and we’ve been able to secure four different stages at the school this year, in what we hope will become a long standing partnership. On the Friday and Saturday ECM records will be showcasing thirteen different groups of homegrown talent at the Tishman auditorium on 14th street and 5th Avenue. That showcase will feature artists like Vijay Iyer and Avishai Cohen, David Torn, Craig Taborn, Michael Formanek, Chris Potter and many others.

    Simon: I hear ECM records founder Manfred Eicher is making a special trip for this series.

    Brice: Yes, we understand that as well. We’re thrilled that he’s going to be in the room.

    Simon: It’s funny that you have all these venues in Greenwich Village which obviously holds great, storied history in jazz music in the United States where you’re presenting this festival. However, none of your acts are featured in any of these sort of jazz club mainstays in Greenwich Village itself like Smalls jazz club isn’t involved, Fat Cat isn’t involved or the Village Vanguard; all of these Greenwich Village jazz clubs. Was that calculated or it just didn’t work out that way?

    Brice: You know it’s somewhat calculated, but not fully. We do include the Zinc Bar, we have included the Zinc Bar almost…every year but for the past seven or eight years of our twelve year history. We choose, though, to offer opportunities to experience the music in non-traditional jazz settings for audience and presenters who are in town for the Arts Presenters Conference. So yes, we will offer a couple jazz clubs, but a lot of the venues feel more like rock clubs or big open theatres; the kind of spaces that a presenter might come in and experience the music in a vibrant setting that might lend, or remind themselves of how they might want to present that artist. So we’re using Le Poisson Rouge as one of our central larger venues, right on Bleecker Street. [Other venues include] the Judson church, which is a historic space right near [the] NYU campus, and …Sub Culture, a little further east of the Village, which is kind of a basement smaller theatre space. So, the goal is to not just be in concert halls and jazz clubs but to offer a varied way to experience the music.

    Simon: How would you say the Winter Jazz Festival is most unlike these other major jazz festivals that is now being compared to the Montreal Jazz Festival, Newport Jazz Festival, etc.

    Brice: One of the unique things that we’re proud of is that we’re presenting so much young talent and new projects. [In] almost everything we present, the goal is that it’s a new project. It’s a project that we feel our colleagues, presenters from around the country, are going to be interested in booking. Partly it’s because we’re excited about the project and partly it’s because we are just proving the point that the future is in the youth and there [is] so much great young talent on the scene right now that we’re thrilled to be able to showcase.

    Simon: Take off your promoter cap for a second. What are the acts, the musicians, the shows you are most looking forward to hearing?

    Brice: It’s hard to take off the promoter hat because for me it’s one in the same - my passion for these artists and what I’m specifically interested in seeing - but we’ll …just start from the top. Artists; it’s no surprise that I’m always excited to see [Kamasi Washington]. I had a chance to see him three times within the past few months and we’re going to be presenting him at the Webster Hall on January 14th. Washington will be performing again with the same group of L.A. musicians plus special guests that we’ve not yet announced. Vijay Iyer is going to close out the night on the ECM stage with his trio. His record release earlier this year Break Stuff is one of my picks of the year. Chicago drummer McCaya McCraven is performing at the Bitter End as part of the Revive Stage. His record In the Moment is also one of my top picks of the year. [I’m] excited to see him. There’s a vocalist performing the music of Gil Scott Heron and Brian Jackson, Charanee Wade and her group, signed to Motema records; they are performing at the New School, [I’m] excited to see that group. I actually have not seen that group live I’ve only heard the music.

    Simon: Shout out to Mark Ruffin who produced that record.

    Brice: Nice. That’s right. Another group that I have not seen live yet, but I’ve heard the record and [I’m] excited to see them when they come over state side from Manchester: Go Go Penguin; newly signed to Blue Note Records. They’re going to be performing at Le Poisson Rouge on the Saturday night January 15 as a part of the Winter Jazz Fest Marathon. So there you have it.

    Simon: Go Go Penguin received some great prize in Europe right? What did they win recently?

    Brice: They’re nominated for the Mercury Prize.

    Simon: Nominated for the Mercury Prize, which is like what-the Grammy of Europe?

    Brice: Every year they give the Mercury Prize to the best up and coming UK artists. So they’re nominated, I think, among another eight or nine different groups. It’s special that for them, being nominated as a jazz group, [as] it’s mostly been given to a pop group.

    Simon: And if you were to describe Go Go Penguin’s sound, I would say they’re sort of like a cross between EST and the Bad Plus; one of these sort of minimalist rock jazz enterprises.

    Brice: Yea, power trio. Exactly. Lots of energy.

    Simon: Power trio. Power jazz. Power to the people. The Winter Jazz Festival continues in its 12th year. I thank Brice Rosenbloom for joining us to talk about it. And we’ll see you this year in the winter time in Greenwich Village.

    Brice: Thank you Simon.