WBGO Blog
  • Interview with Cesar Camargo Mariano with Michael Bourne

    April 18, 2008. Posted by Simon Rentner.

    Add new comment | Filed under: Jazz Alive

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    I attended the BossaBrasil festival last night at Birdland, the first concert of the season celebrating bossa nova'’s 50th anniversary, although I don’t know if it qualifies as a festival because it really only featured two musicians -- pianist Cesar Camargo Mariano and guitarist Joao Bosco -- in an innovative combo, with Harry Allen on sax, Marcelo Mariano on bass, and Jurim Moreira on drums. Both Cesar and Joao are Brazilian legends, and are worthy of all the hype and praise. However the concert didn'’t necessarily make that point. There is no question that the show had some high points. Every moment that Joao Bosco played with Cesar and the band during the second half was captivating. He elevated the music to a spiritual level, and provoked the best out of his cohorts, especially from Mariano. But if anyone worships the early Cesar Camargo Mariano trio recordings of the 1960s (like I do) -- some of which features the radical and highly-advanced Airto on trap set -- the first 30 minutes of the Birdland performance might be a bit of a let down. The rhythm section seemed too docile for Mariano'’s energetic style, especially the careening left hand, his signature form of Brazilian boogie-woogie playing heard from his early releases. Harry Allen'’s sound came so close to Stan Getz, you could close your eyes and swear you were hearing those Getz bossa nova recordings of the sixties. Therein lies the problem, if you love bossa nova. Frankly, many Brazilians don’'t acknowledge those records as “real” bossa nova in the first place...

    If you want more insight into that last remark, you’'ll have to wait for my upcoming bossa nova documentary, “"50 Years of the Beat,"” scheduled to air on WBGO this June. I still highly recommend checking out the show at Birdland, running through the weekend, your chance to see two of Brasil's best in top form.

    In the meanwhile, click here to listen to a few Cesar Camargo Mariano'’s early recordings from the 1960s (which are extremely rare in the US), plus the riveting interview with WBGO’'s Michael Bourne. - Simon

  • Great Live Moments - Dee Dee Bridgewater

    April 18, 2008. Posted by Joshua Jackson.

    Dee Dee Bridgewater

    It has been amazing to know Dee Dee Bridgewater, and an honor to hear her read my name occasionally in the credits for JazzSet. And what an artistic career! Her latest recording, "Red Earth," a collaboration with Malian musicians, is just another reminder of how truly hip she is.
    Long before she was the host of NPR's JazzSet (a program lovingly produced here at WBGO), Dee Dee Bridgewater was a part of our annual New Year's Eve coast-to-coast celebration, Toast of the Nation. From the ballroom at the Grand Hyatt in New York, Bridgewater greeted 1996 on the East Coast with music from her then recent recording, Love and Peace: A Tribute to Horace Silver.

    Listen to Dee Dee Bridgewater sing "Song for My Father," from the WBGO Archives.
    -Josh

  • Lionel Loueke - Live @ J&R Music World

    April 17, 2008. Posted by Angelika Beener.

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    Last weekend, Spring (no, more like Summer) peaked at New York City. It was a perfect Saturday afternoon for being out and about. It was especially highlighted by seeing one of my new favorite musicians live in concert. Lionel Loueke is a spectacular artist, and musician. I first heard of the guitarist/vocalist in 2002 when he was recording for Terence Blanchard on the latter's Blue Note debut, Bounce. I had never really heard anything like it. I had obviously heard many African musicians and varying styles of African music. But never in the context that this cat was introducing. Randy Weston pioneered the movement of taking Jazz to Africa in the 60s, and making a purposeful commitment to making the connections blatantly clear in astonishingly beautiful ways. 40 years later, Loueke has boomeranged it back to the States straight from Benin, Africa...and it is KILLIN'.

    Loueke previously released a trio of albums on indie labels. You should check them all out - my particular fav is Virgin Forest. I won't say that all have "led up to" per se, but Loueke has certainly been put on the map in a major way with his latest CD for the Blue Note label. It's called Karibu, which means "Welcome" in Swahili. It features Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter (no...seriously) and Lionel's long-time killer trio of Massimo Biolcati and Ferenc Nemeth. It should be noted that Lionel has been working hard building a name for himself long before being signed to the reputable Blue Note Records. He had been in Terence Blanchard's band for 5+ years, and has been touring and recording with Mr. Hancock for about 3 years give or take. Needless to say, he's got the hot hand, and anyone with (or without for that matter) any jazz sensibilities knows that he's definitely one to watch.

    We had the honor of hosting and broadcasting Lionel's "CD release" at J&R Music World last week. If you made it out, you know that it was really something. Lionel played tunes from the new CD, and for a special treat, a sweet version of "Body & Soul" in 7/4. He opened the set with the title track, which has a completely infectious Afro-groove. Throughout the set he brought that thing that I have felt is sometimes missing from the scene - fire! Loueke is definitely part of the vibrant jazz movement that is not afraid, conforming, or overly nostalgic.
    He's one of those unpredictable and inspiring artists that just has you coming back again and again...that's how it should be.

    And by the way, if you missed it...not to worry. Check it out here.

    Let us know what you think!