WBGO Blog
  • MONTREAL JAZZFEST 2015, Finale

    July 6, 2015. Posted by Michael Bourne.

    Add new comment | Filed under: FIJM, FIJM 2015

    No better ending for the jazzfest musically than with the godfather of Montreal jazz, pianist Oliver Jones. We talked in the festival videoteque as he was being filmed for a documentary, talked on the floor above the festival museum.  That's where a virtual shrine is the very piano Oliver and Oscar Peterson learned to play on, the piano of Daisy, Oscar's sister and the teacher of them both.

    Daisy Petersons Piano
    Daisy Peterson's Piano

    I've talked with Oliver through all the 23 years I've come to Montreal.  I didn't know until today that he'd left Montreal and lived in Puerto Rico from the mid-60's until 1980.  Oliver was playing there a regular (but not musically happy) gig with a pop band.  When he came back, Charlie Biddle was opening his jazzclub, and soon Oliver was playing the music he was meant to play.  FIJM was just getting started then, and soon Oliver was a regular presence at the jazzfest.  He played for a superstar singer in Quebec, Janet Reno, on one of the first shows I attended at the jazzfest.  "That was one of my favorite gigs," he said.  Another favorite gig of his and everyone's happened when Oliver played with Oscar, his greatest friend and mentor.  Though they'd known each other for decades, they'd never played together in a concert.  Oscar never completely recovered from a stroke, but if you didn't see his crippled hand on the video screen you'd never have known.  Oscar's performance with Oliver was heroic.  And swinging.

    I was there for Oliver and Oscar, and the concert is still available on a DVD, but I reminded Oliver of my favorite of his many concerts at the festival.  His farewell concert in the latter 90's.  His retirement didn't last, but everyone attending that "farewell" evening was filled with love of the music and love for the musician.  I still get weepy remembering Oliver, after playing a lovely solo recital, walking to the front of the stage and thanking everyone for his career playing music for us all.  And then he said "What would you like to hear?"  And he played requests.


    Oliver Jones, playing requests at his retirement concert/credit: Denis Alix

    In recent years, Oliver's festival concerts have been events, often with others from the continuum of Montreal jazz piano that's followed him and Oscar.  This year he joined Pianos Cameleons at the theatre where he played his "farewell," Monument National.   Jon Roney and Matt Herskowitz have been playing for years four-hands classical and jazz concerts, often becoming six-hands concerts with the likes of Julie LaMontagne.  And tonight they were eight-hands with Oliver Jones.

    "Cheek To Cheek" was the only solo and only standard, Oliver's welcome to an evening of fingers to fingers.  Roney and Herskowitz both have fantastic chops, all the more fantastic when playing two pianos back and forth through familiar classics of Chopin and Rachmaninoff  -- classics we can't always remember the etude or concerto numbers of, but classics we've known by heart most of our lives.  Jon and Matt and Julie and Oliver switched off from piece to piece, usually two at a time, but eventually all four shifting seats and keys.

    Oliver Jones in concert, FIJM 2015/credit: Denis Alix
    Oliver Jones in concert, FIJM 2015/credit: Denis Alix

    One treat was one of Oliver's own.   He remembered that when he and Oscar studied with Daisy, she complained that they'd never play piano exercises correctly.  They'd jazz up the exercises.  Oliver composed "Snuggles" around those very exercises, played eight-hands with the Chameleons.  Schumann's "Traumerei" was another highlight.  Climactically, they all ran around the keys playing Brubeck's "Blue Rondo a la Turk"  -- but for the encore, Jon and Matt and Julie pulled all the piano stools around Oliver alone as he played what he's been playing as a concert finale for years, a jazz classic he's turned into the virtual anthem of Montreal jazz, Oscar Peterson's "Hymn to Freedom."

    Oliver Jones in concert, FIJM 2015/credit: Denis Alix
    Oliver Jones in concert, FIJM 2015/credit: Denis Alix

    Festival International de JAZZ de Montreal officially ended on the Big TD stage in the street.  Harmonica whiz Guy Belanger hosted a gathering of Montreal's best blues bands in a tribute to B.B. King.

    BB King Tribute with Guy Balanger/credit: Frederique Menard Aubin
    BB King Tribute with Guy Balanger/credit: Frederique Menard Aubin

    You can hear interviews and music and much more from the festival on "The Checkout" hosted by the indefatigable Simon Renter.

    And see what was happening on the festival's own video retro:

    I can never thank enough all the folks at the festival, especially my dear friend Vincent Lefebvre, international media wrangler for the Herculean press corps.  They all have been beyond generous to me for all these years I've come to the festival.  They have made Montreal for me a home.

    FIJM returns June 26th-July 5th, 2016, and I hope so will I ... MB

  • MONTREAL JAZZFEST 2015, Day 9

    July 5, 2015. Posted by Michael Bourne.

    Add new comment | Filed under: FIJM, FIJM 2015

    Two million fest-goers again this year, even with the rain.  Festival International de JAZZ de Montreal presented a wrap-up early this year. International journalists mostly split on or before Monday -- when the festival usually looks back for the media.  More than 400 accredited journalists and more than 150 other media types attended this year's 36th annual Montreal Jazz Festival, and the execs wanted to look back even before they're done on Sunday.  Jacques-Andre Dupont, the festival's new CEO, presented some of the singers from this year's 10th annual festival blues camp.  Six teenagers, young women, a couple of them wanting to appear sultry, mostly sang sweetly "Trouble In Mind" and "Proud Mary."

    Jazz Camp participants/credit: Benoit Rousseau
    Blues Camp participants/credit: Benoit Rousseau

    Laurent Saulnier, VP of programming, and Andre Menard, artistic director, talked about favorite artists this year, especially surprises.  Andre said that he'd never before heard (and was delighted by) one of the elders, Johnny O'Neal.   Andre also encapsulated the central belief behind 36 years of the jazzfest:  that, bigger, better, whatever the changes, whatever the growth,  FIJM continues to be "a music festival programmed by music fans for music fans."

    Johnny O'Neal/credit: Victor Diaz Lamich
    Johnny O'Neal/credit: Victor Diaz Lamich

    I opted tonight for one show.

    For The Record is a troupe that creates extraordinary shows that celebrate movies in what seem like fevered dreams of songs and scenes.  They presented last year a show that shuffled memorable moments and pop songs from the soundtracks of Quentin Tarantino movies.  They've presented this year a similar and often as violent pastiche of Baz Luhrmann movies.  With a rocking band, highlighted by a violinist in lingerie, four women and five men re-create the doomed lovers and others from Moulin Rouge, Romeo + Juliet, The Great Gatsby, and Strictly Ballroom. While the latter is not as tragic, the other three are violently romantic, with scenes counterpointed by a variety of pop songs.  "Nature Boy." "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend." "Let's Misbehave." Madonna's "Material Girl" and "Like a Virgin."  Tarantino's movies have many more iconic scenes -- I remember feeling all of us anticipating Marsellus going medieval -- but we know what comes from Shakespeare's play and from Fitzgerald's novel, and the singers/dancers/actors were quite visceral and sexy.

  • MONTREAL JAZZFEST 2015, Day 8

    July 5, 2015. Posted by Michael Bourne.

    Add new comment | Filed under: FIJM, FIJM 2015

    STYLE ...
    One of my first impressions at the Montreal Jazz Festival was that they'd created a cool look. I'd been to plenty of festivals by 1992, and all of them sold t-shirts, but most t-shirts were generic: the year, a logo, maybe a local icon, a famous mountain or some such. Montreal's t-shirts featured a cat playing a guitar, or playing drums, or singing (and looking) like Ella, or a cat dancing, or just the hip-looking head of a cat -- with a halo.   Ste. Catherine Street is one of the city's famous thoroughfares and one of the festival's perimeters. Ergo ... Saint Cat.

    Archambault saxophoenix/credit: FIJM
    Archambault saxophoenix/credit: FIJM

    Not always with a halo'd cat, most of the festivals images through the years have been works of Montreal artist Yves Archambaut. Clever. Colorful. Very Montreal.  I've bought dozens of t-shirts with saintly cats and other Archambault designs.    My favorite was last year's Archambault, Saxophoenix,  a rainbow-colored phoenix flying from a saxophonist's bell.  Curiously, the t-shirt is black with the saxophonist bigger, the litho is white with the bird bigger.  I bought both.

    Archambault's design for this year's FIJM is "Electron libre," a dancer (Michael Jackson?) floating among musical instruments.  I also bought a new Ste. Cat.

    This year's FIJM t-shirt/credit: Michael Bourne
    This year's FIJM t-shirt/credit: Michael Bourne

    Among the lifetime-type awards every year is the Prix Bruce Lundvall, named for the great jazz record-maker and meant for someone who's contributed to jazz but is not a musician.  Several jazz record-producers have been honored, also photographer  Herman Leonard, and this year for the first time a journalist!  Bill Milkowski, contributor to Down Beat and other jazz mags, author of an acclaimed bio of Jaco Pastorius, and frequenter of the Montreal jazzfest, was presented this year's award by the festival's artistic director Andre Menard.  Bill talked about his friendship with Bruce Lundvall, about knowing and writing books about Pat Martino and Jaco.  He introduced a documentary about Jaco at a jazzfest theatre.

    Bill and other writers at the jazzfest press conference talked about the business of writing about jazz, about his best and his worst interviews, about the quality (or lack thereof) of jazz writing now that anyone can cyber-scribble opinions on the internet, and especially about how all the changes in technology have affected being a jazz journalist.  Bill remembered that, once upon a time, he typed a piece on an manual typewriter, "with white-out," then he drove into Manhattan on icy streets, he mailed what he'd typed via FedEx to Chicago, and eventually his piece was delivered to Down Beat.  "Now," said Bill Milkowski, "I just push a button."

    Bill Milkowski and Michael Bourne/credit: Victor Diaz Lamich
    Bill Milkowski and Michael Bourne/credit: Victor Diaz Lamich

    Dee Dee Bridgewater sang with trumpeter Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra.  "What's the (French) word for sexy?" Irvin Mayfield shouted at the audience.  A babble shouted back.  And he asked again.  A babble shouted back.  And he asked again.  A babble shouted even louder as the answer walked on.   She sang Harry Connick's "One Fine Thing."  She sang the Gospel According to Duke, "Come Sunday."  She romped some NOLA R&B, "Big Fat Woman."  She scatted like a trombone.  On one of the songs, the trumpet section engaged in a trumpet-go-around, all four of them endeavoring to play higher and faster. They got a standing (and cheering) O.  Dee Dee endeavored to sing higher than a trumpet, but the higher up, the more she sounded like a strangled canary.  So she laughed and came back down to earth, sang a Maisonneuve-quaking "St James Infirmary."

    Betty Bonifassi/credit: Frederique Menard Aubin
    Betty Bonifassi/credit: Frederique Menard Aubin

    I got to Club Soda just in time for Betty Bonafassi.  She's one of the most protean singers I've ever heard.  She's multi-ethnic, speaks many languages (including Farsi and Japanese), sings in even more.  She's created a show called Chants d'esclaves, Chants d'espoir ("Songs of Slaves, Songs of Hope") from listening through the Archive of American Folk Song that ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax recorded for The Library of Congress, especially the collection of African-American songs that came from the tragedy of slavery and through the generations that came after.   She performed the show at Club Soda with a chorus of women, a heavyweight electronic trio, and videos from the period when Alan Lomax was gathering the songs.  Betty's group was almost deafening, but Betty's volcanic voice is even more powerful..